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Benchmarking this class:

struct Sieve {
  std::vector<bool> isPrime;

  Sieve (int n = 1) {
    isPrime.assign (n+1, true);
    isPrime[0] = isPrime[1] = false;

    for (int i = 2; i <= (int)sqrt((double)n); ++i)
      if (isPrime[i]) 
        for (int j = i*i; j <= n; j += i)
          isPrime[j] = false;
  }
};

I'm getting over 3 times worse performance (CPU time) with 64-bit binary vs. 32-bit version (release build) when calling a constructor for a large number, e.g.

Sieve s(100000000);

I tested sizeof(bool) and it is 1 for both versions. When I substitute vector<bool> with vector<char> performance becomes the same for 64-bit and 32-bit versions. Why is that?

Here are the run times for S(100000000) (release mode, 32-bit first, 64-bit second)):

vector<bool> 0.97s 3.12s vector<char> 0.99s 0.99s vector<int> 1.57s 1.59s

I also did a sanity test with VS2010 (prompted by Wouter Huysentruit's response), which produced 0.98s 0.88s. So there is something wrong with VS2012 implementation.

I submitted a bug report to Microsoft Connect

EDIT

Many answers below comment on deficiencies of using int for indexing. This may be true, but even the Great Wizard himself is using a standard for (int i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) in his books, so such a pattern should not incur a significant performance penalty. Additionally, this issue was raised during Going Native 2013 conference and the presiding group of C++ gurus commented on their early recommendations of using size_t for indexing and as a return type of size() as a mistake. They said: "we are sorry, we were young..."

The title of this question could be rephrased to: Over 3 times performance drop on this code when upgrading from VS2010 to VS2012.

EDIT

I made a crude attempt at finding memory alignment of indexes i and j and discovered that this instrumented version:

struct Sieve {
  vector<bool> isPrime;

  Sieve (int n = 1) {
    isPrime.assign (n+1, true);
    isPrime[0] = isPrime[1] = false;

    for (int i = 2; i <= sqrt((double)n); ++i) {
      if (i == 17) cout << ((int)&i)%16 << endl;
      if (isPrime[i]) 
        for (int j = i*i; j <= n; j += i) {
          if (j == 4) cout << ((int)&j)%16 << endl;
          isPrime[j] = false;
        }
    }
  }
};

auto-magically runs fast now (only 10% slower than 32-bit version). This and VS2010 performance makes it hard to accept a theory of optimizer having inherent problems dealing with int indexes instead of size_t.

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2  
Debug or Release build? –  Sven Apr 17 '13 at 20:50
8  
There's a space-optimized vector<bool> template specialization, see cppreference. –  dyp Apr 17 '13 at 20:50
2  
@HugoCorrá bitset has a fixed size (template parameter) –  dyp Apr 17 '13 at 20:52
3  
@DyP, that explains why there's a difference between vector<bool> and vector<char> but doesn't explain the difference between 32 and 64 bit. –  Mark Ransom Apr 17 '13 at 20:54
2  
@DyP I know about more efficient implementations and I will be testing them. I would like to know what is the reason for THIS particular behavior. –  Paul Jurczak Apr 17 '13 at 21:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

I've tested this with vector<bool> in VS2010: 32-bit needs 1452ms while 64-bit needs 1264ms to complete on a i3.

The same test in VS2012 (on i7 this time) needs 700ms (32-bit) and 2730ms (64-bit), so there is something wrong with the compiler in VS2012. Maybe you can report this test case as a bug to Microsoft.

UPDATE

The problem is that the VS2012 compiler uses a temporary stack variable for a part of the code in the inner for-loop when using int as iterator. The assembly parts listed below are part of the code inside <vector>, in the += operator of the std::vector<bool>::iterator.

size_t as iterator

When using size_t as iterator, a part of the code looks like this:

or  rax, -1
sub rax, rdx
shr rax, 5
lea rax, QWORD PTR [rax*4+4]
sub r8, rax

Here, all instructions use CPU registers which are very fast.

int as iterator

When using int as iterator, that same part looks like this:

or  rcx, -1
sub rcx, r8
shr rcx, 5
shl rcx, 2
mov rax, -4
sub rax, rcx
mov rdx, QWORD PTR _Tmp$6[rsp]
add rdx, rax

Here you see the _Tmp$6 stack variable being used, which causes the slowdown.

Point compiler into the right direction

The funny part is that you can point the compiler into the right direction by using the vector<bool>::iterator directly.

struct Sieve {
  std::vector<bool> isPrime;

  Sieve (int n = 1) {
    isPrime.assign(n + 1, true);

    std::vector<bool>::iterator it1 = isPrime.begin();
    std::vector<bool>::iterator end = it1 + n;
    *it1++ = false;
    *it1++ = false;
    for (int i = 2; i <= (int)sqrt((double)n); ++it1, ++i)
        if (*it1)
            for (std::vector<bool>::iterator it2 = isPrime.begin() + i * i; it2 <= end; it2 += i)
                *it2 = false;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
2  
@GManNickG that begs the question, did 32-bit speed up or did 64-bit slow down between VS2010 and VS2012? –  Mark Ransom Apr 17 '13 at 21:23
    
Confirmed that. My timings are: 0.88s for 64-bit and 0.98s for 32-bit version on VS2010. –  Paul Jurczak Apr 17 '13 at 22:01
    
can you look at vector.h for VS2010 vs the one for VS2012? The 2012 version appears to always use unsigned int as underlying storage type, which AFAIK is 32-bit. The statement to look for is typedef unsigned int _Vbase; // word type for vector<bool> representation. –  TemplateRex Apr 17 '13 at 22:05
1  
Okay, then it sounds like we are in agreement: the performance degradation is caused by poor register allocation which causes spilling to the stack. –  James McNellis Apr 18 '13 at 17:30
1  
@PaulJurczak: Well, yes. Optimizers and code generators aren't perfect. Small changes to any piece of code may produce large changes to the generated code (and the performance thereof). –  James McNellis Apr 18 '13 at 19:52

std::vector<bool> is not directly at fault here. The performance difference is ultimately caused by your use of the signed 32-bit int type in your loops and some rather poor register allocation by the compiler. Consider, for example, your innermost loop:

for (int j = i*i; j <= n; j += i)
    isPrime[j] = false;

Here, j is a 32-bit signed integer. When it is used in isPrime[j], however, it must be promoted (and sign-extended) to a 64-bit integer, in order to perform the subscript computation. The compiler can't just treat j as a 64-bit value, because that would change the behavior of the loop (e.g. if n is negative). The compiler also can't perform the index computation using the 32-bit quantity j, because that would change the behavior of that expression (e.g. if j is negative).

So, the compiler needs to generate code for the loop using a 32-bit j then it must generate code to convert that j to a 64-bit integer for the subscript computation. It has to do the same thing for the outer loop with i. Unfortunately, it looks like the compiler allocates registers rather poorly in this case(*)--it starts spilling temporaries to the stack, causing the performance hit you see.

If you change your program to use size_t everywhere (which is 32-bit on x86 and 64-bit on x64), you will observe that the performance is on par with x86, because the generated code needs only work with values of one size:

Sieve (size_t n = 1)
{
    isPrime.assign (n+1, true);
    isPrime[0] = isPrime[1] = false;

    for (size_t i = 2; i <= static_cast<size_t>(sqrt((double)n)); ++i)
        if (isPrime[i]) 
            for (size_t j = i*i; j <= n; j += i)
                isPrime[j] = false;
}

You should do this anyway, because mixing signed and unsigned types, especially when those types are of different widths, is perilous and can lead to unexpected errors.

Note that using std::vector<char> also "solves" the problem, but for a different reason: the subscript computation required for accessing an element of a std::vector<char> is substantially simpler than that for accessing an element of std::vector<bool>. The optimizer is able to generate better code for the simpler computations.


(*) I don't work on code generation, and I'm hardly an expert in either assembly or low-level performance optimization, but from looking at the generated code, and given that it is reported here that Visual C++ 2010 generates better code, I'd guess that there are opportunities for improvement in the compiler. I'll make sure the Connect bug you opened gets forwarded on to the compiler team so they can take a look.

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4  
Now this is interesting... +1 –  Mysticial Apr 18 '13 at 6:33
9  
@PaulJurczak "size_t is useless for indexing in reverse" - That's what the good old "downto operator" exists for: i = v.size(); i --> 0; (but Ok, how far this is actually cleaner is indeed controversial). –  Christian Rau Apr 18 '13 at 9:31
2  
@Christian Rau Upvote for mentioning -->. It is seriously wicked, attracting and repulsing at the same time :-) –  Paul Jurczak Apr 18 '13 at 9:49
2  
@PaulJurczak: With respect to usage of size_t: for (size_t i = v.size() - 1; i != (size_t)-1; --i) has well-defined behavior to count from size() - 1 to 0. Alternatively, loops involving iterators are often more intuitive (and are in many cases preferable, as they make it easier to replace loops with Standard Library algorithms). –  James McNellis Apr 18 '13 at 15:56
2  
@PaulJurczak: Even if v.size() is SIZE_MAX, the loop still works because it starts from v.size() - 1 (so, SIZE_MAX - 1) and iterates until it rolls over and becomes SIZE_MAX, which is equivalent to (size_t)-1. –  James McNellis Apr 18 '13 at 19:29

vector<bool> is a very special container that's specialized to use 1 bit per item rather than providing normal container semantics. I suspect that the bit manipulation logic is much more expensive when compiling 64 bits (either it still uses 32 bit chunks to hold the bits or some other reason). vector<char> behaves just like a normal vector so there's no special logic.

You could also use deque<bool> which doesn't have the specialization.

share|improve this answer
2  
Answer by Wouter Huysentruit below contradicts this theory. –  Paul Jurczak Apr 17 '13 at 21:39
5  
I'd recommend avoiding std::deque if you are using Visual C++ because it uses a very small block size. For more information, see an answer I gave to another question. –  James McNellis Apr 18 '13 at 6:43

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