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I would like to tick off days of certian events, and mark their "streak" - and I want to represent them as squares or circles on a table

As an example "Sunny days" vs. "Cloudy Days"

each COLUMN would count the occurrence of an event, and a change of event would move to the next COLUMN.. Sequences would progress UP (or down) by row.

example - table 5 rows x 10 columns (S = sunny, C = cloudy) Just using javascript - using two buttons, "s" and "c" how would I tell the dom which cell to mark next.

start form blank - click "s" an s goes in the first cell, click "s" and an s goes in the first col second row, click "c" (and because it's a change from last run of days) a c goes in the second col first row... so in short, if the current click is the same as the last, you progress a row, if it's different, you progress a column... and in this regard, it shouldn't be just 2, I could have 3 or 4 "types" of occurrences (like Rain or Snow).

would i just put it all in an array: [s,s,s,s,c,c,s,s,s,s,c,s,c,s,c,c,c,c]

add each event to the array, then loop the array, changing when current!=last ???

but how do I reference the 'correct' table cell?????

<table border="1" width="460" align="center">
    <tr>
        <td>S</td>
        <td>S</td>
        <td>S</td>
        <td>S</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>C</td>
        <td>C</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>S</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>C</td>
        <td>C</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>S</td>
        <td>S</td>
        <td>S</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
    </tr>
</table>
share|improve this question
    
If you're using jQuery, see :nth-child(n). – Mooseman Apr 17 '13 at 20:57
    
example please. – jpmyob Apr 17 '13 at 20:59
    
is this strictly JS or would jQuery and/or PHP be acceptable? – verbumSapienti Apr 17 '13 at 21:10
    
@jpmyob $("tr:first:nth-child(3)") would select the third child of the first tr. – Mooseman Apr 17 '13 at 21:15
    
@Mooseman I think he would like them to be created dynamically – verbumSapienti Apr 17 '13 at 21:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The pieces

The key here is keeping track of

  1. The current object
  2. The past object
  3. The current cell

Each corresponding to one variable. While you are looping, increment these variables as necessary.
For example, if the current object is not the same as the past object (a broken streak), then you have to change the past object into the current object and then move on:

if (current !== past) {
    past = current;
}

So that's a start.

Now, you have to keep track of the current cell. Let's use a JS object to define the row and column. Since we start at row 1, column 1, we'll set the default to:

var cell = {
    "row": 1,
    "col": 1
}

Now, you have to increment the row and column according to the streak. If the streak is extended, then you have to increment the row. If the streak is broken, you have to increment the column and also set the row back to 1:

if (current !== past) {
    past = current;

    // Increment the column and reset the row
    cell.col++;
    cell.row = 1;
} else {
    // Increment row
    cell.row++;
}

Now, we have to place the object into the correct cell. We'll use jQuery's CSS-like selectors to do this. In particular, the :nth-child(...) selector is useful here.
This selector simply selects the n-th numbered child inside of a parent. For example, td:nth-child(2) will select the second td inside of its parent.

Implementing this is fairly easy since we already have the cell object:

$('table tr:nth-child(' + cell.row + ') td:nth-child(' + cell.col + ')').html(current);

.text(current) is also usable here, but it only accepts plain text.

Putting it all together

We'll use array as the definition of the array of weather events:

var array = [s, s, s, s, c, c, s, s, s, s, c, s, c, s, c, c, c, c];

Of course, we use a for loop to run through the array:

var s = "s",
    c = "c",
    array = [s, s, s, s, c, c, s, s, s, s, c, s, c, s, c, c, c, c],
    cell = {
        "row": 1,
        "col": 1
    };

for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {

    var current = array[i],
        past;

    // Catch the initial state
    if (i === 0) {
        past = current;
        $('table tr:nth-child(' + cell.row + ') td:nth-child(' + cell.col + ')').html(current);
    } else {
        past = array[i - 1];
        if (current !== past) {
            past = current;
            // Increment the column and reset the row
            cell.col++;
            cell.row = 1;
        } else {
            // Increment row
            cell.row++;
        }

        $('table tr:nth-child(' + cell.row + ') td:nth-child(' + cell.col + ')').html(current);
    }

}

JSFiddle:
http://jsfiddle.net/kTsEx/3/

share|improve this answer
    
How INCREDIBLY excellent!!! thank you so much Albert. I love that you explained it through the process.... thank you so much. – jpmyob Apr 18 '13 at 5:32

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