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I have several java processes running on a windows machine. I have a Java process which is supposed to monitor the other processes and periodically kill or restart new ones.

If I have a java process running com.foo.Main1 and one running com.foo.Main2 - how can my monitoring process find and kill just the Main2 process?

Update: I have some code that can execute a command line tasklist.exe and parse it, but no matter what I do, I only see the java.exe process, not which class is executing

Update 2: I do not have the ability to install non-java programs.

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See this thread and the second answer about jps. the wmic way will probably work as well. Marking this as a duplicate... – eis Apr 17 '13 at 22:45
    
@eis not really a duplicate since this question asks how to do it from another Java app while the other thread is all about using OS tools to do it – prunge Apr 18 '13 at 4:40
    
I ended up just using a cobbled together bunch of OS commands and a mishmash of ProcessBuilder and Runtime.exec to do it. We should close this as a dupe, as eis suggests. – Kylar Apr 19 '13 at 17:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's probably going to be a lot simpler using OS-specific tools and using Runtime.exec() to run them, but I'll try and give a platform independent answer:


It might be possible to do this platform independently using the Attach API. This comes with the JDK, so to use it just include tools.jar from your JDK on your program's classpath.

To get a list of virtual machines on the system, use VirtualMachine.list(). You can get/parse arguments from the virtual machine descriptor objects that are returned from this.

The attach API also allows you to load agents into already-running Java processes. Since you want to kill a Java process, you can write a Java agent that simply runs System.exit() (or if you really want it dead use Runtime.halt() instead) when the agent loads.

Once you identify the one you want to kill, attach to it and load the killer agent (the agent has to be built as a JAR file, accessible to the Java process it needs to be loaded into). Shortly after the agent is attached that process should die.

These links might help also:

An Oracle blog on the attach API

Package documentation for java.lang.instrument (has detailed instructions on how to build an agent JAR)

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Thanks. I did end up using a bunch of commands like WMIC and TASKKILL, but this was super neat - I didn't know you could get info on other running VM's. +1 for teaching me something new. – Kylar Apr 19 '13 at 17:44
1  
After struggling with the commands not always working (depending on admin/guest settings and other issues) I did end up using the Attach API. Thanks! – Kylar Jul 11 '13 at 18:47

This is specific to Windows. I was facing the same issue where I have to kill the specific java program using taskkill. When I run the java program, tasklist was showing the same program with Image name set as java.exe. But killing it using taskkill /F java.exe will stop all other java applications other than intended one which is not required.

So I run the same java program using:

start "MyProgramName" java java-program..

Here start command will open a new window and run the java program with window's title set to MyProgramName.

Now to kil this java-program use the following taskkill command:

taskkill /fi "MyProgramName"

Your Java program will be killed only. Rest will be unaffected.

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I like this answer, but it doesn't seem as though you can set the "alias" when using the Java ProcessBuilder. – simo.379209 Oct 20 '14 at 5:46

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