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I'm starting to play around with ServiceStack and I'm enjoying it so far but I'm thinking my design is flawed from the get go. Essentially, I have a MSSQL database which I'm accessing via NHibernate. My confusion is coming about due to exactly what structure my request / response DTOs & services should take.

I have my NHibernate mapping in a separate project under MyProject.Common.Models which contains a "Client" class like so:

namespace MyProject.Common.Models
{
    public class Client
    {
        public virtual int ClientID { get; set; }
        public virtual string Name { get; set; }
        public virtual string Acronym { get; set; }
        public virtual string Website { get; set; }
    }

    public class ClientMap : ClassMap<Client>
    {   
        public ClientMap()
        {
            Id(x => x.ClientID, "ClientID").GeneratedBy.Identity();

            Map(x => x.Name, "Name");
            Map(x => x.Acronym, "Acronym");
            Map(x => x.Website, "Website");
        }
    }
}

I want to provide the client the ability to CRUD a single client, as well as displaying a list of all clients. So far, I've designed my single client request like so:

[Route("/clients/{Id}", "GET")]
public class ClientRequest : IReturn<ClientResponse>
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
}

public class ClientResponse : IHasResponseStatus
{
    public MyProject.Common.Models.Client Client { get; set; }
    public ResponseStatus ResponseStatus { get; set; }

    public ClientResponse()
    {
        this.ResponseStatus = new ResponseStatus();
    }
}

Which as you can see is simply returning my model class to the client. With this sort of design, I'm completely at a loss of how to properly POST a new client, or UPDATE an existing client. Also, if I wanted to return a list of all clients, I'm currently using the following request/response DTOs:

[Route("/clients", "GET")]
public class ClientsRequest : IReturn<ClientsResponse>
{

}
public class ClientsResponse : IHasResponseStatus
{
    public List<MyProject.Common.Models.Client> Clients { get; set; }
    public ResponseStatus ResponseStatus { get; set; }

    public ClientsResponse()
    {
        this.ResponseStatus = new ResponseStatus();
    }
}

With a service like so:

public ClientsResponse Get(ClientsRequest request)
{
    var result = currentSession.Query<Chronologic.Eve.Common.Models.Client>().ToList();

    if (result == null)
        throw new HttpError(HttpStatusCode.NotFound, new ArgumentException("No clients exist"));

    return new ClientsResponse
    {
        Clients = result
    };
}

Which works, though I feel like this is also not the best way to achieve what I am attempting to do, and gives me an ugly metadata page showing like so:

Ugly ServiceStack metadata

I feel like I'm overlooking quite simple with this design, and if anyone could suggest to me how to streamline the design it would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should check out these earlier posts which will help with API design with ServiceStack:

Rather than re-hash any of the content contained above, I'll just rewrite it how I'd do it.

You don't need a ResponseStatus property so your services can return clean DTOs.

[Route("/clients", "GET")]
public class AllClients : IReturn<List<Client>> {}

[Route("/clients/{Id}", "GET")]
public class GetClient : IReturn<Client>
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
}

The service implementation should be straight forward based on the above Request DTOs.

With the above API, your C# client call sites now look like:

List<Client> clients = service.Get(new AllClients());

Client client = service.Get(new GetClient { Id = id });
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Demis! I feel like this is a completely different way of doing this since I last played around with SS around the beginning of last year. – slashp Apr 18 '13 at 21:08
    
Yep, the New API has allowed for a lot more freedom which is always good :) – mythz Apr 18 '13 at 21:18

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