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I want to summarize the following code. What it should do is check if the variable in the calculation is assigned. If not, then the result will be zero. Because I have hundreds of calculations like these I don't want to repeat the try-except for every calculation.

How could I do that?

a = 1
b = 2
d = 3
f = 2

try:
    ab = a + b
except:
    ab = 0

try:    
    ac = a - c
except:
    ac = 0

try:    
    bg = b / g
except:
    ac = 0
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1  
What would the exception be? –  jamylak Apr 17 '13 at 23:18
    
If one variable is not assigned. –  ustroetz Apr 17 '13 at 23:21
1  
I mean a better way to structure your code instead of checking for exceptions, you should always know which variables are assigned IMHO –  jamylak Apr 17 '13 at 23:24
4  
It's not entirely clear to me what you're trying to do here, but maybe rather than allowing some variables to be unassigned (is this in an interactive situation? why would variables not be assigned?), you could set them to float('nan'). Then any calculations involving the undefined values will propagate through as nan. –  Dougal Apr 17 '13 at 23:37
2  
More importantly: This is almost certainly an XY problem. Please explain what you're actually trying to do, and why you think you want this, and I'll give you very good odds that we can explain how to solve your real problem in such a way that the apparent problem with exceptions never even arises. –  abarnert Apr 18 '13 at 0:13

3 Answers 3

Write a function to do it, using a lambda (a one-line function) to defer the evaluation of the variables in case one of them doesn't exist:

def call_with_default(func, default):
    try:
        return func()
    except NameError:   # for names that don't exist
        return default

ab = call_with_default(lambda: a+b, 0)
# etc.

You might benefit by using some sort of data structure (e.g. list or dictionary) to contain your values rather than storing them in individual variables; it's possible you could then use loops to do all these calculations instead of writing them all individually.

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking about what you mention in the second paragraph too; tuples would fit nicely, at least for the given code. –  Skurmedel Apr 17 '13 at 23:22
    
Your first option works. However it is still a lot of coding for all the individual calculations. The problem with your second option is that the calculations differ from each time (sorry for not clarifying that in my original post). –  ustroetz Apr 17 '13 at 23:26
    
@user1738154 There may be a solution using lambda, but I'm not sure if there's a way to find a solution as graceful as in Lisp. –  Alexey Apr 17 '13 at 23:28
1  
Also, if the OP's exception comes "if one variable is not assigned", this doesn't help anything, because the attempt to call add_default will raise the exact same NameError, before you even get into the function. –  abarnert Apr 17 '13 at 23:57
    
@abarnert: Good point, for some reason I had in my head that it might just be some of them were None. If you are trying to do calculations on variables that might not even be defined, that just strengthens the case that you should be using a different data structure. Regardless, I've updated my function to use a lambda. –  kindall Apr 18 '13 at 4:42

If you have a bunch of variables that might not even be defined, you probably don't really have a bunch of variables.

For example, if you're trying to build an interactive interpreter, where the user can create new variables, don't try to save each user variable as a global variable of the same name (if for no other reason than safety—what happens if the user tries to create a variable named main and erases your main function?). Store a dictionary of user variables.

Once you do that, the solutions suggested by Alexey and kindall will work:

def add_default(first, second, default):
    try:
        return variables[first] + variables[second]
    except KeyError:
        return default

    variables['ab'] = add_default('a', 'b', 0)

If you really do need to mix in your code and user code at the same level, you can do it, by using globals() itself as your dictionary:

def add_default(first, second, default):
    try:
        return globals()[first] + globals()[second]
    except KeyError:
        return default

ab = add_default('a', 'b', 0)

However, using globals this way is almost always a sign that you've made a major design error earlier, and the right thing to do is back up until you find that error…


Meanwhile, from a comment:

I create a list of all my variables and loop through them if they have a value assigned or not. In case they have not I will set them to float('nan').

There's no way to create a list of variables (except, of course, by referencing them by name off globals()). You can create a list of values, but that won't do you any good, because there are no values for the undefined variables.

This is yet another sign that what you probably want here is not a bunch of separate variables, but a dictionary.

In particular, you probably want a defaultdict:

variables = collections.defaultdict(lambda: float('nan'))
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+1 for the defaultdict / nan suggestion. –  shx2 Apr 18 '13 at 5:06

For a more generic case you may use lambdas (though not too graceful solution):

def lambda_default(func, default, *args):
    try:
        return func(*args)
    except:
        return default

abc = lambda_default(lambda x, y: x + y * z, 0, a, b, c)

In case you have some commonly used functions, you may wrap them into one more def, of course:

def add_default(first, second, default):
    return lambda_default(operator.add, 0, first, second)

ab = add_default(a, b, 0)
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need to write lambda x, y: x + y; just use operator.add. –  abarnert Apr 17 '13 at 23:56
    
Also, as with kindall's answer, this doesn't help the OP's actual problem. If b is not defined, add_default(a, b, 0) will raise a NameError without even calling add_default. –  abarnert Apr 17 '13 at 23:57
    
@abarnert Thanks, I've added operator.add to the second part and have made the first one more complicated to preserve generality. Regarding the NameError. I think there's no way to hide try-catch completely even at runtime. Hopefully I'm wrong. –  Alexey Apr 18 '13 at 0:05
    
Well, the point is that what you (and kindall) have added doesn't help the OP at all. His original problem was that he got a NameError when using undefined variables, so he needed to add try/except to every single expression to handle that. With your proposed solution… he'll still get a NameError when using undefined variables, so he'll still need to add try/except to every single expression to handle that. So what does he gain? –  abarnert Apr 18 '13 at 0:07
1  
Meanwhile, of course there's a way to get around this at runtime: reference the variables by name, and look them up in globals, as my answer shows. It's a very bad idea, but it's the only thing that can possibly help here. –  abarnert Apr 18 '13 at 0:08

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