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I am intending to generate parse trees from java byte codes. A typical byte code is of the following,

public class org.scandroid.testing.InvokeCallArgTest extends org.scandroid.testing.SourceSink{
public org.scandroid.testing.InvokeCallArgTest();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #8; //Method org/scandroid/testing/SourceSink."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static java.lang.String invokeCallArgSourceSpec();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_1
   1:   newarray char
   3:   astore_0
   4:   aload_0
   5:   invokestatic    #16; //Method org/scandroid/testing/SourceSink.load:([C)V
   8:   new     #20; //class java/lang/String
   11:  dup
   12:  aload_0
   13:  invokespecial   #22; //Method java/lang/String."<init>":([C)V
   16:  areturn

public static int invokeCallArgSourceSpecInt();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_1
   1:   newarray char
   3:   astore_0
   4:   aload_0
   5:   invokestatic    #16; //Method org/scandroid/testing/SourceSink.load:([C)V
   8:   aload_0
   9:   arraylength
   10:  ireturn

public static void invokeCallArgSinkSpecInt(int);
  Code:
   0:   iload_0
   1:   invokestatic    #30; //Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
   4:   invokestatic    #36; //Method org/scandroid/testing/SourceSink.sink:(Ljava/lang/Object;)V
   7:   return

public static void invokeCallArgSinkSpecBiInt(int, int);
  Code:
   0:   iload_0
   1:   iload_1
   2:   iadd
   3:   invokestatic    #30; //Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
   6:   invokestatic    #36; //Method org/scandroid/testing/SourceSink.sink:(Ljava/lang/Object;)V
   9:   return

}

My goal is to generate a parse tree or an abstract syntax tree. I am planning to use flex and bison combo. Just want to know will it be a correct approach? and should I start from scratch or there are other tools available for dealing with creating AST from byte code?

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1  
Java byte codes aren't really text to be parsed; there's no documented "grammar". Why do you think this is useful? –  Ira Baxter Apr 18 '13 at 0:01
    
Hi my goal is to compare two AST generated from the byte code of a program from two different versions. I want to have the semantic differences, not line by line differences returned by the diff tool –  P basak Apr 18 '13 at 0:13
    
Using eclipse-jdt plugin you can generate AST from class files/java files. Not sure if byte-code parsing is supported. –  Unni Kris Apr 18 '13 at 12:49
    
You don't need a parser for this, just a scanner. It's a regular language, not a context-free one. –  EJP Apr 20 '13 at 1:26

1 Answer 1

The first step of course is to figure out what you actually want your AST to be. Bytecode has much less use for it than a standard language, because of the lack of variables, scoping, unlabeled breaks, and other features that are most conveniently represented with an AST. You can still have a tree with nodes representing the class, methods, instructions, and operands, but within each method, the code is basically flat.

As for actual implementations, I don't know of anyone who's created ASTs out of bytecode for manipulation due to the reasons above. The closest, you'll come are parsers for bytecode assemblers. For example, you can find the grammar for my assembler here. It uses Ply which is a Python based implementation of Lex and Yacc, so it should be similar. But this is a parse tree designed to assist the process of assembling a classfile, not for any particular programmatic transformations.

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Hi my goal is to compare two AST generated from the byte code of a program from two different versions. I want to have the semantic differences, not line by line differences returned by the diff tool. –  P basak Apr 18 '13 at 0:11
    
Well a bytecode "ast" basically would give you line differences. At best it will help with reordering of methods. –  Antimony Apr 18 '13 at 0:14
    
hi in case of de-compilers how they retrieve the variables and scoping then? also features such as exception handling, try catch block? because it is not visible from the byte code/ –  P basak Apr 18 '13 at 0:16
    
In the case of most decompilers, by relying on patterns left by the Java compiler. It sounds like what you really want is a decompiler. –  Antimony Apr 18 '13 at 0:18
    
a decompiler is the last thing I can get. but sometimes it may fail due to obfuscation. –  P basak Apr 18 '13 at 0:22

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