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Here is my class declaration:

template <class T>
class Sptr {
    template<typename U> friend class Sptr;

    template <typename T1, typename T2>
    friend bool operator==(const Sptr<T1> &a, const Sptr<T2> &b);

    template <typename U>
    friend Sptr<T> static_pointer_cast(const Sptr<U> &sp);

private:

    RC* ref; //reference counter
    T* obj;//pointer to current obj
    std::function<void()> destroyData;

    bool ok_;

public:

    Sptr();
    ~Sptr();

    template <typename U> 
    Sptr(U *);

    Sptr(const Sptr &);

    template <typename U> 
    Sptr(const Sptr<U> &);

    template <typename U> 
    Sptr<T> &operator=(const Sptr<U> &);

    Sptr<T> &operator=(const Sptr<T> &);

    void reset();

    T* operator->() const
    {return obj;};

    T& operator*() const
    {return *obj;};

    T* get() const
    {return obj;};

    explicit operator bool() const {
          return ok_;
    }

};

Below is the code thats complaining of access problem

    template <typename T, typename U>
Sptr<T> static_pointer_cast(const Sptr<U> &sp) {
    //do something
    Sptr<U> answer;

    answer.obj = sp.obj;
    answer.ref = sp.ref;
    answer.destroyData = sp.destroyData;
    answer.ok_ = sp.ok_;

    return answer;
}

when I compile with the following code:

    Sptr<Derived> sp(new Derived);
    Sptr<Base1> sp2(sp);

    // Sptr<Derived> sp3(sp2); // Should give a syntax error.
    Sptr<Derived> sp3(static_pointer_cast<Derived>(sp2));
    // Sptr<Derived> sp4(dynamic_pointer_cast<Derived>(sp2)); // Should give syntax error about polymorphism.

I have already made it a friend function. Why is it not able to access the variables and how to correct it?

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2  
Two minor tips which don't have anything to do with your problem: You shouldn't put semicolon after a function implementation. And you can make the operator== a member and it thus doesn't have to be a friend. –  leemes Apr 18 '13 at 0:33
    
Either it's a copy-paste error when you wrote your question or an error in your code: In the implementation of static_pointer_cast you're actually copying an Sptr<U> to an Sptr<U> which is then cast to Sptr<T> in the return statement. Did you want to allocate a Sptr<T> and then copy each field? –  leemes Apr 18 '13 at 0:38
    
template<typename U> friend class Sptr; != template <typename T, typename U> Sptr<T> static_pointer_cast(const Sptr<U> &sp) –  kfsone Jun 1 '13 at 3:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a bit tricky. Your code compiles if you replace

template <typename U>
friend Sptr<T> static_pointer_cast(const Sptr<U> &sp);

with

template <typename T1, typename T2>
friend Sptr<T1> static_pointer_cast(const Sptr<T2> &sp);

The reason is the following (I am not 100% sure, so please someone approve / dis-approve):

When Sptr<T> is instantiated, e.g. with T = Derived, the resulting class definition (Sptr<Derived>) defines a friend function having the following signature:

template <typename U>
friend Sptr<Derived> static_pointer_cast(const Sptr<U> &sp);

So this is a function which only has one template parameter. But the function you defined has two template parameters.

Your call to this templated function is a specialization which looks like this:

Sptr<Derived> static_pointer_cast(const Sptr<Base1> &sp) {
    //do something
    Sptr<Derived> answer;

    answer.obj = sp.obj;
    answer.ref = sp.ref;
    answer.destroyData = sp.destroyData;
    answer.ok_ = sp.ok_;

    return answer;
}

So it tries to access both Base1 and Derived, but it's only a friend of Derived, not of Base1. This last sentence is the important thing, and changing it to a friend function with two template parameters solves this issue.

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There is probably a syntax to define the original declaration, but it's going to be tricky. To define 2 template parameters as you suggest is probably the cleanest and easiest to read solution. –  Nathan Ernst Apr 18 '13 at 0:30

You said friend sptr<t>, which means it can only access the private members of sptrs to the same type. since sp2 is not a sptr( t is derived) it is not a friend. Try :

template< class u, class v> friend sptr<u> static_pointer_cast(const sptr<v> &sp);
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to StackOverflow. Take care of formatting your answer. To format code, put 4 spaces before each line (or press the {} button). Your current answer hides the template parameters, since it's parsed as HTML... –  leemes Apr 18 '13 at 0:34

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