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I have a gem that I am working on. In it is an executable that parses a Config file and then instantiates a couple of objects. One of these objects then instantiates a number of "handler" objects. I am parsing the config file into an array, CONFIG, but the settings within are not accessible in any of the other objects. They are needed in the handlers. When I try to use them, the variable does not exist.

I understand that this is a variable scope issue. However I am not sure what I need to do to make these accessible throughout the entire program (including sub/nested objects) and not just the initial executable. While each of the objects in the program are within a module, the actions in the executable are not.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Constants are global, but they live in the namespace in which they are defined.

If you define CONFIG in the main context, it will be global at the root-level. If you define it in a class or module, you must refer to it by its full name outside of that context.

For example:

class Foo
  CONFIG = File.read(...)
end

CONFIG # => Error, not defined
Foo::CONFIG # => Defined

It's generally bad form to reference constants by name, they run against the grain of proper object-oriented design. As such, if you define constants, they should be used internally only, and exposed via methods that sub-classes can redefine or patch as required.

A better example:

class Foo
  CONFIG = File.read(...)

  def self.config
    CONFIG
  end
end

Foo.config # => Your configuration

This simple abstraction is important because a sub-class can re-define your configuration:

class Bar < Foo
  def self.config
    # ... Different implementation
  end
end

Bar.config # => Different result

Even better is to avoid constants altogether and simply lazy-load things as required:

class Foo
  def self.config
    @config ||= File.read(...)
  end
end

Foo.config # => Your configuration

Constants are best reserved for things that do not change, like SEPARATOR = ':', where it's not possible or practical to reconfigure them without breaking a lot of code.

Where you have something that's read in from an external source, where it might vary based on configuration or preference, it's usually more convenient to have a method that intermediates this.

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Wow, this is a great answer and gives me a lot of insight as to the scope of things. Ruby is my first go at anything object oriented. In this case, I am loading the config in the "main" part of the code, outside of any class. Do I need to move the config into its own class, or is there some other "Good" way to do this in that context? –  Jericon Apr 18 '13 at 22:02
    
Having the config in its own class makes it a lot easier to test, so it's probably a good idea. It's also nice when the config itself is contained in a tidy structure rather than being strewn around in dozens of independent variables. –  tadman Apr 19 '13 at 16:48

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