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I have the following custom attribute that I would like to have a type name as a property. However, I do not want to have to use the string representation of the type when using the attribute. Example:

public class HelpMeAttribute : Attribute
{
    public string TypeName { get; set; }
}

And to use it, I thought this

[HelpMe(TypeName = typeof(MyClass2).FullName]
public class MyClass1
{
}

public class MyClass2
{
}

I get the error: "An attribute must be a constant expression, typeof expression or array creation expression of an attribute parameter type."

I would prefer not to do:

[HelpMe(TypeName = "MyClass2"]

because that seems bad to have the type in a string. Better to let the compiler check that the type I am putting in the attribute exists.

Can someone point me down the path of enlightenment to fix this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Attribute initializers can only use compile-time constants or System.Type properties.

So why not just use Type?

public class HelpMeAttribute : Attribute
{
    public Type Type { get; set; }
    ...

    public HelpMeAttribute()
    {
    }
}

...
[HelpMe(Type = typeof(MyClass2))]
public class MyClass1
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that will compile as is. I think you need to define a constructor that takes the type in and assigns it. But otherwise, it's correct and that's the way I'd do it too. +1 –  Chris Sinclair Apr 18 '13 at 2:17
    
Any properties of attributes that have a public setter can be set like that. Although yeah, you could do it either way. –  p.s.w.g Apr 18 '13 at 2:19
    
Ahh didn't know that. I actually had tested yours but I had a typo. Had too much wine in me and thought the compiler error was saying it was incorrect syntax. :) –  Chris Sinclair Apr 18 '13 at 2:21
    
Using a Type instead of a string works great. Thanks. –  bcuzz Apr 18 '13 at 15:29

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