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I can't figure out how to tie these functions together for a hard AI, in which it can never lose. I'm supposed to be using recursion in some form or fasion and these function names and contracts were pre-written, I filled in the actual definition. Much googling later, I can't find anything that relates. Any ideas fellas?

"""


State S2 is a *successor* of state S1 if S2 can be the the
next state after S1 in a legal game of tic tac toe.

safe: state -> Bool
successor: state x state -> Bool

1. If S is over, then S is safe if 'x' does not have 3 in a row in S.
2. If it is o's move in S, then S is safe iff at least one successor of S is safe.
3. If it is x's move in S, then S is safe iff all successors of S are safe.

A *stateList* is a list of states. 
"""


# safe: state-> Bool
#
# A state S is *safe* if player 'o' can force a win or tie from S.

def safe(S):
    if over(S): return not threeInRow('x',S)
    if turn(S)=='o': return someSafeSuccessor(S)
    if turn(S)=='x': return allSafeSuccessors(S)

def threeInRow(p,S):
    if p == 'x':
        if all(t in S[0] for t in (1,2,3)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[0] for t in (4,5,6)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[0] for t in (7,8,9)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[0] for t in (1,4,7)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[0] for t in (2,5,8)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[0] for t in (3,6,9)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[0] for t in (1,5,9)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[0] for t in (3,5,7)):
            return True
    else:
        if all(t in S[1] for t in (1,2,3)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[1] for t in (4,5,6)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[1] for t in (7,8,9)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[1] for t in (1,4,7)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[1] for t in (2,5,8)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[1] for t in (3,6,9)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[1] for t in (1,5,9)):
            return True
        elif all(t in S[1] for t in (3,5,7)):
            return True

# someSafeSuccessor: state -> Bool
#
# If S is a state, someSafeSuccessor(S) means that S has
# at least one safe successor.

def someSafeSuccessor(S):
    flag = False
    # flag means we have found a safe successor
    for x in successors(S):
        if safe(x): flag = True
    return flag

# allSafeSuccessors: state -> Bool
#
# If S is a state, allSafeSuccessors(S) means that every
# successor of S is safe.
def allSafeSuccessors(S):
  flag = True
  for x in successors(S):
    if not safe(x): flag = False
  return flag    


# successors: state -> stateList
#
# successors(S) is a list whose members are all of the successors of S.
def successors(S):
  stateList=[]
  for i in range(1,10):
    if empty(i,S):
      stateList.extend(S[0],S[1]+[i])
  return stateList
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3  
I suggest you google minimax (minimax tree, min-max tree...) and alpha-beta pruning. –  Patashu Apr 18 '13 at 5:14
    
@shx2 You clearly did not read the question :) –  Patashu Apr 18 '13 at 5:15
    
I can't use those trees sadly which sucks because there's so much information on them. I'm supposed to be using the functions that I supplied above to make the decision –  user2293538 Apr 18 '13 at 5:20
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1 Answer

Followup on my comment.

The trees that are visualized when describing the minimax (/alpha-beta pruning) algorithm is NOT a 'real tree' in the sense that you construct the entire tree in memory. It is a conceptual tree, the result of testing every move depth first, taking note of the scores at each leaf (alpha, beta, etc) and propagating them up.

Note the words, depth-first. This means that your recursive minimax-implementing function starts by calling itself with the first move it can make. Which starts by calling itself with the first move it can make. And so on until you reach the maximum depth or a terminal move, THEN you return. You can see by this logic that you never have more boards in memory or any external storage other than the single chain of moves being considered right now (and, at each level, you'll be iterating through the list of possible moves to make from it - so there's also that memory of how far through you are, etc).

tl;dr By doing depth-first minimax recursion, you won't make any new functions except your single recursive function.

share|improve this answer
    
@Yblock Pages like en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minimax and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha%E2%80%93beta_pruning have great pseudocode to analyze. If that still doesn't click, get out pen and paper and figure out how you would do it in your head/in english/in your own words. Then translate that to pseudocode and compare. –  Patashu Apr 18 '13 at 5:29
    
Please do not offer monetary incentives (cash, bitcoins, etc.) for work on SO. That's not how it works. –  Karl Knechtel Apr 18 '13 at 7:33
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