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I'm looking at Azure Reserved Web Sites as an option for ASP.NET application hosting. But I couldn't find information about the following two aspects:

  1. Is the Reserved instance size/resources (e.g. Medium VM, 2 x 1.6GHz CPU, 3.5GB RAM) shared with the instance OS and OS services, just like a VM? Or is this a dedicated computing capacity excluding the OS?

  2. In a blog post (http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2012/09/17/announcing-great-improvements-to-windows-azure-web-sites.aspx) Scott Guthrie mentioned about running multiple sites in a single Reserved instance (much like a VM but without fully-managed), but it's not clear to me as to how multiple sites (with different domains names) are setup/configured in Reserved instances from the Management Tool:

you could run a single site within a reserved instance VM or 100 web-sites within it for the same cost

Any clarification is appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

  1. Just like a VM, it will be shared with instance OS and OS services.
  2. For hosting multiple web sites in reserved instance...read here...Is it possible to have multiple azure web sites running off a single reserved instance also. and How to configure multiple host headers for one Azure WebSite reserved instance You can also read more about host headers in Microsoft documentation.
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In order to run multiple web sites on a single server go to your azure management portal. Pick a web site you would like to scale to a standard server. You will see the list of all your web sites deployed to azure. You can pick the ones you want to be deployed to your standard server instance together.

See screenshot below from the management portal.

enter image description here

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