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Please, please can someone explain below to me. Its driving me nuts. I am playing with creating 8-bit grayscale images from arrays in java.

The code below should produce black > white horiz gradients. Parts 1 and 2 do produce desired image, but in the int[] passed to getimageFromarray in 1 goes from -128 to 127, and in 2 goes from 0 to 255, yet they produce the same image. 3 produces the (undesired) image I would expected 1 to produce, going on its max and min values alone.

Why is this? How can this be?

import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.awt.image.WritableRaster;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;

import javax.imageio.ImageIO;

public class Test {

    final static int WIDTH = 320;
    final static int HEIGHT = 256;

    // Black and white as int
    final static int BLACK = 0;
    final static int WHITE = 255;
    //...same, but not
    final static int BLACK_WRONG = 127;
    final static int WHITE_WRONG = -128;

    // Black and white as byte val
    final static byte BLACK_BYTE = -0x80; //i.e -128
    final static byte WHITE_BYTE = 0x7f; // i.e. 127



    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException { 

        int[] pixels = new int[WIDTH*HEIGHT];
        int[] m;

        // Generates gradient1.bmp
        // produces as expected - black at top, white at bottom
        int numb=0,c=0;
        byte grey1 = BLACK;
        while (numb<pixels.length){

            // inc through greyscales down image
            if (c>WIDTH){
                grey1++;
                c=0;
            }       

            // cast from byte to int
            pixels[numb] = grey1; 

            // inc column and count
            c++;
            numb++;
        }

        m = getMaxMin(pixels); // max 127 , min -128
        System.out.printf("Maxmin %s; %s;\n",m[0], m[1]);
        getImageFromArray("gradient1.bmp", pixels,WIDTH, HEIGHT);

        //*************************************************************************
        // Generates gradient3.bmp
        // produces as expected - black at top, white at bottom

        numb=0;     
        c=0;
        int grey2 = BLACK; //i.e zero
        while (numb<pixels.length){

            // inc through greyscales down image
            if (c>WIDTH){
                grey2++;
                c=0;
            }       

            // no cast
            pixels[numb] = grey2; 

            // inc column and count
            c++;
            numb++;
        }

        m = getMaxMin(pixels); // max 255, min 0
        System.out.printf("Maxmin %s; %s;\n",m[0], m[1]);
        getImageFromArray("gradient2.bmp", pixels,WIDTH, HEIGHT);

        //*************************************************************************
        // Generates gradient3.bmp
        // produces as unexpected - midgrey > white. black > midgrey
        numb=0;     
        c=0;
        byte grey3 = BLACK_BYTE; //i.e zero
        while (numb<pixels.length){

            // inc through greyscales down image
            if (c>WIDTH){
                grey3++;
                c=0;
            }       

            // no cast
            pixels[numb] = grey3; 

            // inc column and count
            c++;
            numb++;
        }

        m = getMaxMin(pixels); // max 127 , min -128
        System.out.printf("Maxmin %s; %s;\n",m[0], m[1]);
        getImageFromArray("gradient3.bmp", pixels,WIDTH, HEIGHT);
    }



//*******************************************************************************
    static int sWidth,sHeight = 0;        
    static BufferedImage sImage = null;
    static WritableRaster sRaster=null;

    public static BufferedImage getImageFromArray(String filename, int pixels[], int width, int height) throws IOException {
        if (sImage == null){
        sImage = new BufferedImage(width, height, BufferedImage.TYPE_BYTE_GRAY);
        sRaster = sImage.getRaster();
        }

        sRaster.setPixels(0,0,width,height,pixels);
        try {
            ImageIO.write(sImage, "bmp", new FileOutputStream(filename));
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return sImage;
    }


    static int[] getMaxMin(int[] v){
        int max=0,min=0;
        for (int i:v){
            if (i>max) max = i;
            if (i<min) min = i;
        }
        int[] r = {max,min};
        return r;
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that BufferedImage takes RGBA (or similarly) encoded colors as input, you needs to properly construct those ints from their respective RGBA components.

To convert the signed bytes R = 0, G = 0, B = 0, A = 127 for GRAY, you'd have convert them to unsigned ints and combine them into one int, like so:

int color = (((A & 0xff) << 24 | ((B & 0xff) << 16) | ((G << 8) | (R & 0xff));

This is the same as assigning the hex values of 7f 7f 7f ff. The & 0xff masking is necessary to properly convert the signed bytes (-128 to 127) to an unsigned int (0 to 255).

The << 'left shifts' the bytes around inside the int.

You may have to change the input order of RGBA to get the correct result.

share|improve this answer
    
thx for (sole!) answer. Yeah, the BufferedImage is set to BufferedImage.TYPE_BYTE_GRAY so only takes one value per pixel, but useful when I move onto RGBA stuff nevertheless. With a quick google, I think there is something in unsigned vs. signed int/bytes you mention. Will look into that and see if its the source of my confusion. –  Jon Apr 18 '13 at 19:56

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