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A query that used to work just fine on a production server has started becoming extremely slow (in a matter of hours).

This is it:

SELECT * FROM news_articles WHERE published = '1' AND news_category_id = '4' ORDER BY date_edited DESC LIMIT 1;

This takes up to 20-30 seconds to execute (the table has ~200.000 rows)

This is the output of EXPLAIN:

+----+-------------+---------------+-------------+----------------------------+----------------------------+---------+------+------+--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table         | type        | possible_keys              | key                        | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra                                                                    |
+----+-------------+---------------+-------------+----------------------------+----------------------------+---------+------+------+--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | news_articles | index_merge | news_category_id,published | news_category_id,published | 5,5     | NULL | 8409 | Using intersect(news_category_id,published); Using where; Using filesort |
+----+-------------+---------------+-------------+----------------------------+----------------------------+---------+------+------+--------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Playing around with it, I found that hinting a specific index (date_edited) makes it much faster:

SELECT * FROM news_articles USE INDEX (date_edited) WHERE published = '1' AND news_category_id = '4' ORDER BY date_edited DESC LIMIT 1;

This one takes milliseconds to execute.

EXPLAIN output for this one is:

+----+-------------+---------------+-------+---------------+-------------+---------+------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table         | type  | possible_keys | key         | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+---------------+-------+---------------+-------------+---------+------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | news_articles | index | NULL          | date_edited | 8       | NULL |    1 | Using where |
+----+-------------+---------------+-------+---------------+-------------+---------+------+------+-------------+

Columns news_category_id, published and date_edited are all indexed.

The storage engine is InnoDB.

This is the table structure:

CREATE TABLE `news_articles` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `title` text NOT NULL,
  `subtitle` text NOT NULL,
  `summary` text NOT NULL,
  `keywords` varchar(500) DEFAULT NULL,
  `body` mediumtext NOT NULL,
  `source` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `source_visible` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `author_information` enum('none','name','signature') NOT NULL     DEFAULT 'name',
  `date_added` datetime NOT NULL,
  `date_edited` datetime NOT NULL,
  `views` int(11) DEFAULT '0',
  `news_category_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `user_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `c_forwarded` int(11) DEFAULT '0',
  `published` int(11) DEFAULT '0',
  `deleted` int(11) DEFAULT '0',
  `permalink` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `user_id` (`user_id`),
  KEY `news_category_id` (`news_category_id`),
  KEY `published` (`published`),
  KEY `deleted` (`deleted`),
  KEY `date_edited` (`date_edited`),
  CONSTRAINT `news_articles_ibfk_3` FOREIGN KEY (`news_category_id`) REFERENCES `news_categories` (`id`) ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `news_articles_ibfk_4` FOREIGN KEY (`user_id`) REFERENCES `users` (`id`) ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=192588 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

I could possibly change all queries my web application does to hint using that index. but this is considerable work.

Is there some way to tune MySQL so that the first query is made more efficient without actually rewriting all queries?

share|improve this question
    
When was the last time you ran ANALYZE TABLE news_articles;? You may need to update the cardinality of indexes. Also, having an index spanning multiple fields may increase performance here. – Wrikken Apr 18 '13 at 6:38
    
Can you try with index on multiple column: create index my_idx on news_articles(published,news_category_id,date_edited); – shola Apr 18 '13 at 6:40
    
Also, if you almost always order by date_edited, you could see what ALTER TABLE news_articles ORDER BY date_edited; does (mind you, it recreates the whole table, so might take a while, and if you are inserting / updating in the table you may want to run that at some regular intervals (days probably). – Wrikken Apr 18 '13 at 6:41
    
I had this index and actually removed during my tests. It didn't seem to make any difference. – vassilis Apr 18 '13 at 6:53
    
@Wrikken ANALYZE has been run recently. I used to have a multiple fields index (news_category_id, published, date_edited). I dropped it as a test, but it didn't make any difference. I'm not sure ALTER ... ORDER BY ... make sense for me, as the table is already sorted in that order (a few rows might be out of order, but for the most part they are ordered by edited_date) – vassilis Apr 18 '13 at 7:00

just a few tips..

1 - It seems to me the fields published and news_category_id are INTEGER. If so, please remove the single quotes from your query. It can make a huge difference when comes to performance;

2 - Also, I'd say that your field published has no many different values (it is probably 1 - yes and 0 - no, or something like that). If I'm right, this is not a good field to index at all. The parse in this case still has to go through all the records to find what it is looking for; In this case move the news_category_id to be the first field in your WHERE clause.

3 - "Don't forget about the most left index". This affirmation is valid for your SELECT, JOINS, WHERE, ORDER BY. Even the position of the columns on the table are imporant, keep the indexed ones on the top. Indexes are your friend as long as you know how to play with them.

Hope it can help you in somehow..

SELECT * FROM news_articles WHERE published = '1' AND news_category_id = '4' ORDER BY date_edited DESC LIMIT 1;

share|improve this answer

Original: SELECT * FROM news_articles WHERE published = 1 AND news_category_id = 4 ORDER BY date_edited DESC LIMIT 1;

Since you have LIMIT 1, you're only selecting the latest row. ORDER BY date_edited tells MySQL to sort then take 1 row off the top. This is really slow, and why USE INDEX would help.

Try to match MAX(date_edited) in the WHERE clause instead. That should get the query planner to use its index automatically.

Choose MAX(date_entered): SELECT * FROM news_articles WHERE published = 1 AND news_category_id = 4 AND date_edited = (select max(date_edited) from news_articles);

share|improve this answer
    
I don't follow why that should be "really slow" if the index does its job. Ultimately the two queries do the same thing, and the optimizer should know this. – PreferenceBean Nov 12 '14 at 10:14

Please change your query to :

SELECT * FROM news_articles WHERE published = 1 AND news_category_id = 4 ORDER BY date_edited DESC LIMIT 1;

Please note that i have removed quotes from '1' and '4' data provided in query

The difference in the datatype passed and the column structure does not allow mysql to be able to use the index on these 2 columns.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated the question above – vassilis Apr 18 '13 at 7:05
    
Please try the solution and let me know if helps the execution. – Rohit Kumar Apr 18 '13 at 7:09
    
This makes no difference – vassilis Apr 18 '13 at 7:11

If you only need a few field, i suggest to type it one by one instead using *, regards.

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