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I'm trying to write a generic method, and the code below gives errors.

Cannot convert type 'T2' to 'T1'

'T1' does not contain a definition for 'Action' and no extension method 'Action' accepting a first argument of type 'T1' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)

private List<T2> FillChildControlOnSave<T1, T2>(
        ref T1 objEntity, ref List<T1> _entityParent, ref List<T2> _entityDetail)
{
    foreach (T2 c in _entityDetail)
    {
        if (c.Action == XERP.Entity.ActionMode.Add)            
            objEntity.PlnBOMDetails.Add(c);

        var tmp = objEntity.PlnBOMDetails
                     .Where(p => p.BOMDetailRecordID == c.BOMDetailRecordID && 
                                 p.BOMID == c.BOMID && 
                                 p.IsDeleted == false)
                     .FirstOrDefault();

        if (tmp != null)
           if (c.Action == Entity.ActionMode.Delete)            
               objController.Context.PlnBOMDetails.DeleteObject(tmp);            
    }

    return _entityDetail;

}

If I replace T1 and T2 with PlnBOMMaster,PlnBOMDetail then above syntax works fine. How to solve this generic method problem?

share|improve this question
1  
Notice: using ref is not very good idea. Underscore in parameter names is not very good idea. You are not using _entityParent parameter in your code. You don't need to pass List if you are only enumerating it. You don't need to use generics if you are working with concrete object properties. Just program to some abstraction instead (interface or base class). –  Sergey Berezovskiy Apr 18 '13 at 7:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to restrict T1 and T2 to certain classes or interfaces, you need to use generic constraints, like this:

private List<T2> FillChildControlOnSave<T1, T2>(ref T1 objEntity, 
                                                ref List<T1> _entityParent, 
                                                ref List<T2> _entityDetail)
    where T1 : PinBOMMaster
    where T2 : PinBOMDetail
{
    ...
}

Of course PinBOMMaster and PinBOMDetail can be replaced with an appropriate interface, such as this:

public interface IMaster<TDetail>
    where TDetail : IDetail
{
    List<TDetail> Details { get; }
}

public interface IDetail
{
    int RecordID { get; }
    int BOMID { get; }
    bool isDeleted { get; }
    Entity.ActionMode Action { get; set; }
}

public class PinBOMMaster : IMaster<PinBOMDetail>
{
    ...
}

public class PinBOMDetail : IDetail
{
    ...
}

private List<T2> FillChildControlOnSave<T1, T2>(ref T1 objEntity, 
                                                ref List<T1> _entityParent, 
                                                ref List<T2> _entityDetail)
    where T1 : IMaster<T2>
    where T2 : IDetail
{
    ...
}

Note: if your entities are created by a code generation tool, you'll have to use partial classes to apply the interface implementations.

Of course, you probably can't use objController.Context.PlnBOMDetails.Add(c). You'll have to replace it with generic code, like this:

// for DbContext
objController.Context.Set<T2>().Add(c);

// for ObjectContext
objController.Context.CreateObjectSet<T2>().AddObject(c);

Of course, you can also write your own method to do this. For example, the IDetail / IMaster interfaces could have an AddToContext(...) method which takes the context and inserts itself into the appropriate collection. Then in FillChildControlOnSave you just call c.AddToContext(objConctroller.Context);.

share|improve this answer
    
But in this case we don't need generics, don't we? :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Apr 18 '13 at 7:38
    
There could still be a use for generics even in that case -- e.g. if you want the return type to exactly match the input type. –  p.s.w.g Apr 18 '13 at 7:55
    
That's good point, +1 –  Sergey Berezovskiy Apr 18 '13 at 7:56
    
p.s.w.g thanks for reply,I can not use PlnBOMMaster, PlnBOMDetail in where statement because,it’s a common method ,I need to use this method in several time with my several entities –  shamim Apr 18 '13 at 7:57
    
@shamim the same principle applies, although you'll have to create interfaces for your entities. See my updated answer. –  p.s.w.g Apr 18 '13 at 8:04

If you want to invoke members on instances of T1 and T2 then you have to tell the compiler something about those types:

private T2 Bar<T1,T2>(T1 actionable) where T1 : IActionable, T2 : IActionResult
{
    T2 result = actionable.Action();
    return result;
}

You can specify constraints on T1 and T2 using the where keyword after the method's arguments.

You can also specify things such as:

where T : new()  // has a default constructor
where T : struct // is a value type
where T : class  // is a reference type
share|improve this answer

You are looping throught a list of T2 with this line :

foreach (T2 c in _entityDetail)

Then you are accessing the property Detail of c in this line :

if (c.Action == XERP.Entity.ActionMode.Add)

How the compiler could know that the type T2 contain such a property?

You need to constraint the generic to be one kind of interface like this:

interface IPlnBOMDetail { XERP.Entity.ActionMode Action {get;}}
class PlnBOMDetail : IPlnBOMDetail {}

private List<T2> FillChildControlOnSave<T1, T2>(ref T1 objEntity, ref List<T1> _entityParent, ref List<T2> _entityDetail)
    where T2 : IPlnBOMDetail 

The same for all the rest of your code.

A side note: using ref parameter is a code smell.
I advise you to read this topic : When to use ref and when it is not necessary in C#.
TL;DR : Jon Skeet said

you almost never need to use ref/out

share|improve this answer
    
Scorpi0 thanks for reply,I can not use PlnBOMMaster, PlnBOMDetail in where statement because,it’s a common method ,I need to use this method in several time with my several entities –  shamim Apr 18 '13 at 7:59
    
@shamim in that case you need to get those types to implement interfaces which provide the required operations, then constrain your type parameters to those interfaces. It's either that or do some truly horrible things with reflection or the DLR to go hunting for a method which may or may not exist (and sacrifice type safety along the way). –  Matthew Walton Apr 18 '13 at 8:26

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