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I am writing a simple function that creates a new node at the beginning of a linked list. When I try to execute the file my Windows Command error window comes up saying "a.exe has stopped working."

What is a mystery to me is that when I add a printf call within the body of the insertNewNodeAtFront, the code executes without the above error box. Ideas?

Here is the source file:

#include <stdio.h>


typedef struct NodeTag{
    const char* Airport;
    struct NodeTag * Link;                
    } NodeType;


void insertNewNodeAtFront(NodeType *, const char*);


void insertNewNodeAtFront(NodeType * L,  const char* str){

    NodeType * N;
    N = L;    
    NodeType * NewFirst;
    NewFirst->Airport = str;
    NewFirst->Link = N;
    L = NewFirst;
   //printf("L->Airport: %s\n",L->Airport); <---This is the line that magically makes it work.
}

int main(){
    NodeType * myitinerary;
    insertNewNodeAtFront(myitinerary,"ONT");
    return 0;
}
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What does your debugger say? –  bash.d Apr 18 '13 at 7:41
    
How do you know that "a.exe has stopped working." is an error? –  Maroun Maroun Apr 18 '13 at 7:42
    
I haven't actually ran a debugger on this one. Which do you suggest for a Windows based system for C? –  Thalatta Apr 18 '13 at 7:43
    
@MarounMaroun Good point! I just assumed given my general novice programmer status that it was one :). –  Thalatta Apr 18 '13 at 7:45
    
I'm not convinced MarounMaroun has a real point. It is quite obviously an error unless you intended a.exe to crash when you wrote it... by definition. –  roliu Apr 18 '13 at 8:03
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4 Answers

As hmjd has said, the crash is caused by using uninitialised memory. The reason it doesn't crash at that point when you add more code is that this causes the compiler to move things around in memory, so the uninitialised variable points somewhere different.

It is still bad, however: your code has still blatted some random location in memory which most likely will cause a crash another time.

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The code is deferencing an unitialized pointer, causing undefined behaviour:

NodeType * NewFirst;
NewFirst->Airport = str;

allocate memory for NewFirst before using:

NodeType* newFirst = malloc(sizeof(*newFirst));
if (newFirst)
{
}

The printf() is playing a lead role in the mainifestation of undefined behaviour, but is not the cause.

Additionally, if you want the change to L to be visible to the caller you need to pass in the address of the pointer to insertNewNodeAtFront() as C passes by value (see http://c-faq.com/ptrs/passptrinit.html):

void insertNewNodeAtFront(NodeType** L,  const char* str){
    /* ...snip... */
    *L = NewFirst;
}

NodeType* myitinerary = NULL;
insertNewNodeAtFront(&myitinerary,"ONT");
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is the if (NewFirst) checking if the allocation was successfull? Does C not guarantee that malloc will return a non NULL pointer? –  Thalatta Apr 18 '13 at 7:53
    
@user2276081, yes it checks it is not NULL. And no, malloc() is not guaranteed to be successful, if it fails it returns NULL. –  hmjd Apr 18 '13 at 7:54
    
You should look up the documentation for malloc before using it. I am not sure what documentation is appropriate for whichever implementation of C you are using... on a GNU/Linux machine man malloc would work (unless you decided to use some crazy compiler for a C implementation violating C standards). If you can find the documentation for the C implementation you are using then use that as your reference. –  roliu Apr 18 '13 at 8:07
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When your program has undefined behaviour, all sorts of things can happen.

Specifically, you never actually allocate memory (with malloc) for your nodes, so when you start doing things like NewFirst->Airport = str; - it's overwriting random addresses in memory (NewFirst is an uninitialised pointer). All bets are off. You should probably search for example code implementing a linked list before you continue with your implementation attempt.

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I knew something felt funny about dereferencing a pointer in memory that I hadn't allocated. –  Thalatta Apr 18 '13 at 7:51
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Instead of this code

 void insertNewNodeAtFront(NodeType * L,  const char* str){

        NodeType * N;
        N = L;    
        NodeType * NewFirst;
        NewFirst->Airport = str;
        NewFirst->Link = N;
        L = NewFirst;
       //printf("L->Airport: %s\n",L->Airport); <---This is the line that magically makes it work.
    }

Use this code to insertFirst

void insertNewNodeAtFront(NodeType ** L,  const char* str){


    NodeType * NewFirst = malloc(sizeof(NodeType));
    NewFirst->Airport = str;
    NewFirst->Link = *L;
    *L = NewFirst;
    printf("L->Airport: %s\n",(*L)->Airport);
}

In Main Function

insertNewNodeAtFront(&myitinerary,"ONT");
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In this line NodeType * myitinerary; insertNewNodeAtFront(myitinerary,"ONT"); what you going to pass? Which value? In this line, you just pass some garbage value(undefined).. –  Mani Apr 18 '13 at 7:52
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