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Suppose I have the following dictionary:

{"A":["u","w"],"B":["t"],"C":["x","y","z"]}

How can I sort the dictionary by number of strings in the list in of each value so that it returns:

[("C",["x","y","z"]), ("A",["u","w"]), ("B":["t"])]

Because the value of "C" has three items in the list, "A" has two, "B" has one. I was thinking something along the lines of:

sorted(d.items(),key=operator.methodcaller(len(),tuple[1]),reverse=True)

Or

sorted(d.items(),key=(string, stringList):(len(stringList),string),reverse=True)

But both do not seem to work. Still quite new to sorting, so thanks for the help!

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operator.methodcaller takes a string as the first paramater, the method to call, tuple[1] doesn't exist at the time you call it. Also key is a function, not a tuple. –  jamylak Apr 18 '13 at 7:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
>>> d = {"A":["u","w"],"B":["t"],"C":["x","y","z"]}
>>> sorted(d.items(), key=lambda x: len(x[1]), reverse=True)
[('C', ['x', 'y', 'z']), ('A', ['u', 'w']), ('B', ['t'])]
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That was fast! Thank you jamylak, marking your response as the answer in 11 minutes. –  Cortana Apr 18 '13 at 7:48

You almost had it.

>>> sorted(d, key=lambda x: len(d[x]), reverse=True)
['C', 'A', 'B']

Or, to get the values as well:

>>> sorted(d.items(), key=lambda x: len(x[1]), reverse=True)
[('C', ['x', 'y', 'z']), ('A', ['u', 'w']), ('B', ['t'])]
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Using a lambda:

sorted(d.items(), key=lambda x: len(x[1]), reverse=True)
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If you are interested in one way to do it without using a lambda (because some people tend to scrunch up their nose when seeing these in python), it goes something like this:

f = operator.itemgetter(1)
sorted(d.items(), key=Compose(len, f), reverse=True)

Where Compose is an unfortunately non-built-in functionality defined in the accepted answer to this question.

Note: I post this version for academic interest only. Your problem is actually a good use case for lambda.

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