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I've this simple code:

class ResourceInterceptor: IResourceInterceptor
        {

            public bool OnFilterNavigation(NavigationRequest request)
            {
                return false;
            }

            ResourceResponse IResourceInterceptor.OnRequest(ResourceRequest request)
            {
                request.Referrer = "http://www.google.com";
                return null;
            }
        }

I would need to pass a variable to the class (just read it, do not edit), but if I insert a variable not declared within the class it gives me this error:

Cannot access a non-static member of outer type 'WindowsFormsApplication1.Form1' via nested type 'WindowsFormsApplication1.Form1.ResourceInterceptor'

For example i need somethin like this (obviously doesn't works!)

public string referrer = "www.google.com";
class ResourceInterceptor: IResourceInterceptor
        {

            public bool OnFilterNavigation(NavigationRequest request)
            {
                return false;
            }

            ResourceResponse IResourceInterceptor.OnRequest(ResourceRequest request)
            {
                request.Referrer = referrer;
                return null;
            }
        }
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2  
What do you need to pass where? Please show what you are actually trying. –  bash.d Apr 18 '13 at 7:51
1  
please provide an SSCCE, that is a short compilable example. This is just a random piece of code. –  Default Apr 18 '13 at 7:52
    
Can you make the referrer as public static string referrer ? –  Sen Jacob Apr 18 '13 at 7:53
    
@SenJacob public editable fields shouldn't exist.. maybe through a property though. –  Default Apr 18 '13 at 7:54
1  
@SenJacob nice article. No problem per se with public fields, encapsulation, exactly. However, IMO a string Refererrer{ get; set; } is just as simple as a public field, and more easily refactored into a backing store later, because you don't have to change the calling code. If the field is a complex type the property can as well give out the common interface used, thus easing refactoring even more. –  Default Apr 18 '13 at 8:11
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use an initializing constructor. For example:

class ResourceInterceptor: IResourceInterceptor
{
    public ResourceInterceptor(string referer)
    {
        m_Referer = referer;
    }

    public bool OnFilterNavigation(NavigationRequest request)
    {
        return false;
    }

    ResourceResponse IResourceInterceptor.OnRequest(ResourceRequest request)
    {
        request.Referrer = m_Referrer;
        return null;
    }

    private string m_Referer;
}

And then simply pass the referer to the constructor when you create an instance of the class:

ResourceInterceptor interceptor = new ResourceInterceptor("www.google.com");
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Thank you man, this works! –  Ldg Apr 18 '13 at 8:07
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Another solution, if you only need that variable in all class instances is to use a class (static) property:

class ResourceInterceptor : IResourceInterceptor
{
    // Public class property.
    public static string Referer { get; set; }
    ResourceResponse IResourceInterceptor.OnRequest(ResourceRequest request)
    {
        request.Referrer = Referer;
        return null;
    }
}

// Somewhere else...
ResourceInterceptor.Referer = "www.google.com";

After this, all your ResourceInterceptor instances will share the same Referer class attribute.

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1  
In this case it's even easier to use a static field instead of static property. –  Pavel Vladov Apr 18 '13 at 8:10
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