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table #1:

CREATE TABLE Department(
  Dept_ID char(02) Primary Key, 
  Dept_Name varchar(20) , 
  Manager_ID char(03), 
  Location_ID char(04)
)

table #2:

CREATE TABLE employee (
   Employee_ID char(03) Primary key, 
   First_Name varchar(10), 
   Dept_ID char(02) foreign key references Department(Dept_ID),
   Email varchar(10), 
   Tel_No char(10),
   Hire_Date Date
)

When i try to create a FOREIGN KEY in the table #2. I get the following error.

ORA-00907: missing right parenthesis

Please be kind enough to advice me whats wrong in my code and how can i fix this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just remove foreign key:

CREATE TABLE employee (
   Employee_ID char(03) Primary key, 
   First_Name varchar(10), 
   Dept_ID char(02) references Department(Dept_ID),
   Email varchar(10), 
   Tel_No char(10),
   Hire_Date Date
)

Because foreign keys reference the primary key by default,

CREATE TABLE employee (
   Employee_ID char(03) Primary key, 
   First_Name varchar(10), 
   Dept_ID char(02) references Department,
   Email varchar(10), 
   Tel_No char(10),
   Hire_Date Date
)

would also be sufficient.

NB the foreign key column is not mandatory -- you didn't specify not null anywhere, so it's an optional foreign key.

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2  
This is syntactically correct but I think this is bad practice. When we don't specify constraint names Oracle generates them. It's okay for NOT NULL check constraints but we quite often need to refer to primary and foreign keys by name. It's a lot simpler to do that with meaningful names. –  APC Apr 18 '13 at 8:03
1  
Letting Oracle auto-generate the constraint names also makes syncing databases much harder, because (at least with certain tools) you always get a sync script that wants to drop the constraint and re-create it if the names differ. –  Frank Schmitt Apr 18 '13 at 8:34

Foreign keys are often added as constraints in Oracle:

CREATE TABLE employee (
   Employee_ID char(03) Primary key, 
   First_Name varchar(10), 
   Dept_ID char(02),
   Email varchar(10), 
   Tel_No char(10),
   Hire_Date Date,
   CONSTRAINT fk_department foreign key (Dept_ID) references Department(Dept_ID)
)
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1  
An inline definition is also possible if it's not a compound foreign key. –  Colin 't Hart Apr 18 '13 at 7:57
    
I saw your answer after I posted mine. But you don't get to use the flashy FOREIGN KEY keyword. And you don't get to name your constraint. ;-) Sometimes there's more than one way to do it. –  Klas Lindbäck Apr 18 '13 at 8:16
    
Who downvoted this answer and why? –  Colin 't Hart Apr 18 '13 at 8:24
    
@Colin'tHart I guess it was downvoted because Klas stated "Foreign keys are added as constraints in Oracle" - this sounds like it is the only way, which is untrue. –  Frank Schmitt Apr 18 '13 at 8:32
    
I have updated my answer to reduce the risk of someone being misled. –  Klas Lindbäck Apr 18 '13 at 9:06

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