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I'm still having problems calculating numbers.

Trying to find the amount of numbers inside [-0.5 , 0.5] the first line, and the amount of numbers outside the same range in the second line.

I use abc = rnorm(100, mean=0, sd=1). So I have 100 numbers in total, but i only have 35 numbers inside the range, and 35 outside the range, that dosen't add up to 100.

length(abc[abc>=-0.5 & abc<=0.5])
[1] 35

length(abc[abc<-0.5 & abc>0.5])
[1] 35

Then I tried:

length(which(abc>=-0.5 & abc<=0.5))
[1] 40

length(which(abc<-0.5 & abc>0.5))
[1] 26

And it still doesn't add up to 100. What's wrong?

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| != & ...... –  BondedDust Apr 18 '13 at 8:07

4 Answers 4

You are after:

R> set.seed(1)
R> abc = rnorm(100, mean=0, sd=1)
R> length(abc[abc >= -0.5 & abc <= 0.5])
[1] 41
R> length(abc[abc < -0.5 | abc > 0.5])
[1] 59

What went wrong

Two things:

  1. abc < -0.5 & abc > 0.5 is asking for values less than -0.5 and greater than 0.5
  2. However, you actually had: abc[abc<-0.5 & abc>0.5] This does something a bit different due to scoping. Let's pull it apart:

    R> abc[abc<-0.5 & abc>0.5]
     [1] 1.5953 0.7383 0.5758 1.5118 1.1249 0.9438 <snip>
    

    Now let's look at abc

    R> abc
    [1] FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  
    

    You've changed the value of abc! This is because <- is the assignment operator. You have set abc equal to 0.5 & abc > 0.5. To avoid this, use spacing (as in my code).

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Excellent explanation of the two gotchas here –  James Apr 18 '13 at 8:14

When wanting to find numbers inside and outside a radius like this, it can be helpful to consider the absolute value, and you then only have one comparison to make:

length(abc[abs(abc)<=0.5])
[1] 41
length(abc[abs(abc)>0.5])
[1] 59

Or you can use cut and table to do it in one line:

table(cut(abs(abc),c(-Inf,0.5,Inf)))

  (-Inf,0.5] (0.5,Inf] 
       41        59 
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As a shortcut, you can also do it this way :

set.seed(1)
abc <- rnorm(100, mean=0, sd=1)
sum(abc>=-0.5 & abc<=0.5)
# [1] 41
sum(abc< -0.5 | abc>0.5)
# [1] 59

This works because sum considers TRUE as 1 and FALSE as 0.

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Alternatively via subset:

set.seed(1)
abc <- rnorm(100, mean=0, sd=1)

length(subset(abc, abc >= (-0.5) & abc <= 0.5))
[1] 41
length(subset(abc, abc < (-0.5) | abc > 0.5))
[1] 59
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