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My Code is:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;


template <typename T, int X>

class Test
{
   private:
    T container[X];
   public:
    void printSize();

};
template <typename T, int X>
void Test<T,X>::printSize()
{
    cout <<"Container Size = "<<X <<endl;
}


int main()
{
    cout << "Hello World!" << endl;
    Test<int, 20> t;
    Test<int, 30> t1;

    t.printSize();
    t1.printSize();
    return 0;
}

Question:

  1. How many specialization will get generated?. If I understand correctly , it generates two specializations one is for <int, 20> and another is for <int, 30>. Kindly Correct if my understanding is wrong?
  2. Is there any way to see/check the number of specializations generated by any reverse engineering?
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1  
This may help stackoverflow.com/questions/4448094/… –  FireAphis Apr 18 '13 at 8:26
    
@FireAphis, thanks for the link. –  Whoami Apr 18 '13 at 8:29
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1) yes, two instantiations will be generated by the compiler, but the linker might merge functions with identical generated code (using whole program optimization e.g.), which is a cute way to reduce code bloat.

2) see this question where it is explained how gcc can generate template instantiation output.

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There are not specializations here, only instantiations (this questions explains the difference). This code generates two instantiations of the class template Test.

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I think when saying specializations he meant generated-classes. i actually dont understand why two (classes) are created, if its still an int in both times. –  Infested Apr 18 '13 at 8:14
    
@Infested the value of X differs –  TemplateRex Apr 18 '13 at 8:16
    
@rhalbersma ive noticed that, but its still an int. how would i write it so the "X" part doesnt make a difference? –  Infested Apr 18 '13 at 8:19
    
@Infested: If you don't want the X to make a difference, make it a parameter to the constructor of Test. Then you cannot have a statically sized array as member though. This is the semantic difference between std::array and std::vector. –  Björn Pollex Apr 18 '13 at 8:20
    
@BjörnPollex that i know also, but is there a way to hold two types in the template and with one not making a difference for different values? lets say LIST<T> and you create LIST<int> t1; LIST<int> t2; it will not generate LIST<int> twice, only instantiate t1 and t2 twice. –  Infested Apr 18 '13 at 8:24
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1) How many specialization will get generated?. If I understand correctly , it generates two specializations one is for and another is for . Kindly Correct if my understanding is wrong?

Yes, there are two.

2) Is there any way to see/check the number of specializations generated by any reverse engineering?

If you have the code, you don't need reverse engineering. If you don't have it, you can not find it out with generated code, because it's compile time.

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a) There are 2 instances of specialization get created in your example.

b)There is no builtin method to support number of specialization generated for a class. If its your project you can add static count. If you want you can write your own reference count mechanism for your class. Increment static count in our constructor.

static int created = 0;
static int alive = 0;
class Test
{
counter()
    {
        created++;
        alive++;
    }
~counter()
{
  created--;
}
//Rest of class
};
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Your counter would count the number of instances of the class, not instantiations of the template. –  Angew Apr 18 '13 at 8:29
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