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Interviewer asked me this question, I was puzzled by this term I know static as well what is index in term of collections. but what is static indexer?? I googled but didn't found any satisfactory answer..

Can any body help me to understand this?

Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by hangy, gsharp, MarcinJuraszek, Neil Knight, mathieu Apr 18 '13 at 8:55

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I'd say it's an indexer that is static, but I understand your confusion. Not sure if that's what your recruiter would've wanted to hear :S –  Nolonar Apr 18 '13 at 8:14
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@hangy I saw that question too, but still it didn't answer the question what I am expecting?? the question posted was 'Why Static indexers is not allowed in C#'?? but my question is 'what is static indexer'? :( –  BreakHead Apr 18 '13 at 8:17
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I don't know if you are aware that there is no stattic indexer in c#. It could be a trick question from your interviewer or he may be trying to size up of your understanding of static access level or indexers. –  Edper Apr 18 '13 at 8:25

1 Answer 1

static indexer is Not Possible in C#

Indexer semantics require the 'this' keyword which defines the block of code as an indexer, and is a also reference to the current instance of a class. Since a static indexer would have no such reference, it stands to reason that you can't define an indexer as static. That's just my personal interpretation, there may be a bigger picture than that.

However, if you have a special need, indexers are just a convenience - you can accomplish what you want to do the old fashioned way through methods.

The fact of the matter is, however, that indexers can't be defined as static.

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this is just an indication to compiler that this member is a class indexer, you could as well use mars for that place holder and it would serve the same purpose. –  Tanveer Badar Jun 24 at 13:16

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