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Can any one help me how to iterate through dictionary with dates, I have the data set like this

data=[{u'a': u'D', u'b': 100.0, u'c': 201L, u'd': datetime.datetime(2007, 12, 29, 0, 0), u'e': datetime.datetime(2008, 1, 1, 6, 27, 41)},
      {u'a': u'W', u'b': 100.0, u'c': 201L, u'd': datetime.datetime(2007, 12, 29, 0, 0), u'e': datetime.datetime(2008, 2, 4, 6, 27, 41)},
      {u'a': u'W', u'b': 100.0, u'c': 202L, u'd': datetime.datetime(2007, 12, 30, 0, 0), u'e': datetime.datetime(2008, 1, 1, 4, 20, 44)},
      {u'a': u'D', u'b': 100.0, u'c': 202L, u'd': datetime.datetime(2007, 12, 30, 0, 0), u'e': datetime.datetime(2008, 3, 11, 6, 27, 41)},
      {u'a': u'D', u'b': 100.0, u'c': 202L, u'd': datetime.datetime(2007, 12, 30, 0, 0), u'e': datetime.datetime(2008, 5, 8, 11, 2, 41)},
      {u'a': u'D', u'b': 100.0, u'c': 203L, u'd': datetime.datetime(2008, 1, 2, 0, 0), u'e': datetime.datetime(2008, 6, 1, 6, 27, 41)},
      {u'a': u'W', u'b': 100.0, u'c': 204L, u'd': datetime.datetime(2008, 2, 9, 0, 0), u'e': datetime.datetime(2008, 4, 21, 12, 30, 51)},
      {u'a': u'D', u'b': 100.0, u'c': 204L, u'd': datetime.datetime(2008, 2, 9, 0, 0), u'e': datetime.datetime(2008, 8, 15, 15, 45, 10)}]

How can i bring it into the dictionary of below format

res={u'201L':(1,0,1),(2,1,0),(3,0,0),(4,0,0).. so on till (12,0,0),
u'202L':(1,1,0),(2,0,0),(3,0,1),(4,0,0),(5,0,1)...(12,0,0),
u'203L':(1,0,0),(2,0,0),(3,0,0),(4,0,0),(5,1,0)...(12,0,0),
u'204L':(1,0,0),(2,0,0),(3,0,0),(4,1,0),(5,0,0),(6,0,0,(7,0,0),(8,0,1)...(12,0,0)}

where 1, 2, 3 is the first, second month and so on from their card issue date i.e for 201L issue date is datetime.datetime(2007, 12, 29, 0, 0), 202L it is datetime.datetime(2007, 12, 30, 0, 0)

first month means from 2007-12-29 to 2008-1-29

  (1,0,1)---where 1 is the first month
  0 is no of times W
  1 is no of times D

I tried something like this

data_dict=defaultdict(Counter)
date_dic={}
for x in data:
  a,b,c,d=x['a'],x['c'],x['d'],x['e']
  data_dict[b][a] += 1
for key , value in data_dict.items():
   date_dic[key] = tuple(map(datetime.date.isoformat, (c,d)))
   for value in range(1,30):
      if value not x: continue

I have been stuck after if loop what can i add to get in the above format.I end up getting something like this as my output,

defaultdict(<class 'collections.Counter'>, {201L: Counter({u'D': 1, u'W': 1}), 202L: Counter({u'D': 2, u'W': 1}), 203L: Counter({u'D': 1}), 204L: Counter({u'D': 1, u'W': 1})})
share|improve this question
    
I see that user 204L has 2 card issuing dates; perhaps you need to recalculate the buckets per transaction in that case? Currently my answer assumes just one starting date per user, we could switch that to caching the buckets per issuing date instead. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 11:03
    
So for 204L, the withdrawal is in the 3rd 30-day period, but the deposit is in the 6th bucket compared to the new issue date, vs. the 7th bucket my current code puts it in. Can you confirm? –  Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 11:06
    
We can expand the buckets as needed, I'll update. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 13:49
    
You can iterate over v too; that is just a regular Python list. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 30 '13 at 10:07
    
Right, that's because my answer creates buckets dynamically; if there was no activity beyond the first month there is no second bucket. Use try, except IndexError to handle those and set the count to 0 for that user for that month. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 30 '13 at 10:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd create a list of dates, then find the 'bucket' to put each item into from that list.

You can create new dates relative from a starting point using datetime.timedelta() objects:

startdate = data[0]['d']
buckets = [startdate + datetime.timedelta(days=30) * i for i in xrange(12)]

Now you have 12 dates to compare everything else against, so you know what bucket to put each subsequent value in:

>>> buckets
[datetime.datetime(2007, 12, 29, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 1, 28, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 2, 27, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 3, 28, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 4, 27, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 5, 27, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 6, 26, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 7, 26, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 8, 25, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 9, 24, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 10, 24, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2008, 11, 23, 0, 0)]

We can then use the bisect module to find the matching bucket:

from bisect import bisect

bisect(buckets, somedate) - 1  # Returns a value from 0 - 11

We create such buckets per user so we need to keep track of the buckets in a separate mapping. We'll actually create buckets on the fly as needed to fit the current transaction date.

Next, we use a collections.defaultdict instance to track per-key tallies (key c in your input):

from collections import defaultdict

res = defaultdict(list)
empty_counts = {'D': 0, 'W': 0}

This creates a list for your buckets to hold, and a empty counts dictionary for the deposits and withdrawals. I used a dictionary here because that is much easier to work with than having to manipulate (immutable) tuples later on. I also did not include the month number (1 - 12); no point, you already have an index for each bucket (0 - 11), and you can have a variable number of buckets.

We need to create buckets and counters as needed to fit the current date in; instead of scanning throuh the data to find the max transaction date per user we just expand our buckets and counts list as needed:

def expand_buckets(buckets, bucket_counts, start, transaction):
    # This function modifies the buckets and bucket_counts lists in-place
    if not buckets:
        # initialize the lists
        buckets.append(start)
        bucket_counts.append(dict(empty_counts))

    # keep adding 30-day spans until we can fit the transaction date
    while buckets[-1] + datetime.timedelta(days=30) < transaction:
        buckets.append(buckets[-1] + datetime.timedelta(days=30))
        bucket_counts.append(dict(empty_counts))

Now we can start counting:

per_user_buckets = defaultdict(list)

for entry in data:
    user = entry['c']
    type = entry['a']
    transaction_date = entry['e']
    buckets = per_user_buckets[user]
    bucket_counts = res[user]
    expand_buckets(buckets, bucket_counts, entry['d'], transaction_date)

    # count transaction date entries per bucket
    bucket = bisect(buckets, transaction_date) - 1
    bucket_counts[bucket][type] += 1

The bisect call makes picking the right bucket easy and fast.

The result for your example input is:

>>> pprint(dict(res))
{201L: [{'D': 1, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 1}],
 202L: [{'D': 0, 'W': 1},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 1, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 1, 'W': 0}],
 203L: [{'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 1, 'W': 0}],
 204L: [{'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 1},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 0, 'W': 0},
        {'D': 1, 'W': 0}]}
share|improve this answer
    
per_user_buckets = defaultdict(lambda: user_buckets(entry['d'])) might work as well. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 25 '13 at 11:49
    
@J.F.Sebastian: That presumes entry is in the local scope at that time then; I'd prefer the explicit handling here. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 11:55

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