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This is what my code looks like.

HTML

<div id="container">
   <ul>
      <li>...</li>
      <li>...</li>
      <li>...</li>
   </ul>
</div>

CSS

#container {
  width: 584px;
  height: 50px;
  position: relative;
  overflow: hidden;
}

#container ul {
  position: absolute;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  width: 3504px;
}

#container ul li {
  width: 584px;
  float: left;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  overflow: hidden;
}

As the title says, I want to center the ul vertically inside the div. I cannot change the above CSS rules because. I've been googling solutions and trying to find a way, but everything seems to collide with the rules I already have.

Any idea how to do this?

Would it help if instead of the #container div I used a table with one row and column?

share|improve this question
    
With absolute positioning you can only do that if you know the element height beforehand (or measure it with JavaScript). –  CBroe Apr 18 '13 at 9:14
    
I can do that. Could you give me some more details, please? –  JanaBanana Apr 18 '13 at 9:16
    
try to add : auto; to your margin:0; –  DiederikEEn Apr 18 '13 at 9:19
    
That does not work. –  JanaBanana Apr 18 '13 at 9:21
    
possible duplicate of Using margin:auto to vertically align div –  o.v. Apr 18 '13 at 9:54

4 Answers 4

Please use the search function in the future. The full answer is explained here; this is the code for your scenario:

.container {
  display: table;
  height: 100%;
  position: absolute;
  overflow: hidden;
  width: 100%;}
.helper {
  #position: absolute; /*a variation of an "lte ie7" hack*/
  #top: 50%;
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;}
ul{
  #position: relative;
  #top: -50%;
  margin:0 auto;
  width:200px;}

The three elements have to be nested like so:

<div class="container">
  <div class="helper">
    <ul><!--stuff--></ul>
  </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Don't you think I already searched for an answer? Your way does not work. –  JanaBanana Apr 18 '13 at 10:12
#container ul {
  position: relative;
  margin: 0px auto;
  padding: 0;
  width: 3504px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is not working. –  JanaBanana Apr 18 '13 at 9:28
    
This is horizontal centring. –  MMM Apr 18 '13 at 9:41

"Centring" a div or other containers vertically is quite tricky in CSS, here are your options.

You know the height of your container

If you know the height of the container, you can do the following:

#container {
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    margin-top: -half_of_container_height_here;
}

So we essentially place in the middle and then offset it using a negative margin equal to the half of the height. You parent container needs to have position: relative.

You don't know the exact height of your container

In this case you need to use JavaScript and calculate the appropriate margins (unfortunately you cannot use margin-top: auto or something similar).

More info here.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried my best to cover the reason why margin-top cannot be auto here - as well as more elegant ways of centering content vertically than using absolute positioning :) –  o.v. Apr 18 '13 at 9:58

If you can add jQuery library you could try this,

$(document).ready(function(){

    // Remove li float
    $("#container ul li").css("float", "none");

    // Get the full height of the UL
    var ulheight = $("#container ul li")[0].scrollHeight;

    // Based on the height of the container being 50px you can position the UL accordingly
    var pushdown = (50-ulheight)/2;
    $("#container ul li").css("top", pushdown);

});
share|improve this answer
    
Why remove the float? –  Lorax Apr 18 '13 at 9:26
    
For the sake of troubleshooting. I'd try and get the bare bones solution working first before adding anything else which could affect positioning. Since it was said that CSS can't be modified then you could remove it via jQuery. –  Rob Apr 18 '13 at 9:30
    
I meant that I needed the CSS for other reasons, not that it is virtually impossible to remove it :D –  JanaBanana Apr 18 '13 at 9:40
    
-1, avoid using javascript for styling whenever possible - especially when this can be accomplished with css, this is good practice to avoid the so-called "flash of unstyled content" –  o.v. Apr 18 '13 at 9:55
    
Yeah, maybe, but this is the only thing that's actually doing what I need. –  JanaBanana Apr 18 '13 at 10:12

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