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In the following code I expect pn.get(8).get(8) to return an array of Integers (in this example length of array is 1, but in my program it's longer). Instead I get an array of Objects.

Can someone please tell me why and what I'm doing wrong.

ArrayList<ArrayList<HashSet<Integer>>> pn =
    new ArrayList<ArrayList<HashSet<Integer>>>();

for (int x = 0; x < 9; x++) 
{
    pn.add(x, new ArrayList<HashSet<Integer>>());

    for (int y = 0; y < 9; y++) {
        pn.get(x).add(y, new HashSet<Integer>());
        pn.get(x).get(y).add(new Integer(x));
    }
}


for (Integer i: pn.get(8).get(8).toArray())
{
    System.out.println(i);
}
share|improve this question
    
How do you know you're getting an array of objects? Are you getting an exception? –  drewmoore Apr 18 '13 at 9:48
    
yes: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error: Unresolved compilation problem: Type mismatch: cannot convert from element type Object to Integer –  Petter H Apr 18 '13 at 9:54
    
see my answer... –  drewmoore Apr 18 '13 at 9:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

All you need to do is remove the toArray() call in your for statement, which is returning Object[] instead of Integer[] as you might have expected. This is an artifact of how Java implements generics using type erasure. A run time, the JVM doesn't know that your HashSet is of type Integer, so toArray() has to return an array of Object[].

Thankfully, HashSet can be iterated directly so the toArray() call is unnecessary. The following works for me:

ArrayList<ArrayList<HashSet<Integer>>> pn = new ArrayList<ArrayList<HashSet<Integer>>>();

for (int x = 0; x < 9; x++) 
{
    pn.add(x, new ArrayList<HashSet<Integer>>());

    for (int y = 0; y < 9; y++) {
        pn.get(x).add(y, new HashSet<Integer>());
        pn.get(x).get(y).add(new Integer(x));
    }
}


for (Integer i: pn.get(8).get(8))
{
    System.out.println(i);
}
share|improve this answer

Remove the toArray() , it returns a Object[] , while you loop variable is an Integer , hence the error.

for (Integer i: pn.get(8).get(8))
  {
       System.out.println(i);
  }
share|improve this answer

<Collection>.toArray by default will return an untyped (Object) array. To type it, that is to say which type to use (Integer in your case), use:

Integer[] integers = pn.get(8).get(8).toArray(new Integer[pn.get(8).get(8).size()]);
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This happens as a result of type erasure (See oracle doc here), which becomes an issue when you call toArray(). Because HashSet is an iterable collection, the call to toArray() is unnecessary anyway: You can simply use for (Integer i: pn.get(8).get(8))

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If you really want the array try this

    HashSet<Integer> temp = pn.get(8).get(8);
    Integer i[] = new Integer[temp.size()] ;

    for (Integer j: temp.toArray(i)) {
        System.out.println(j);
    }

Otherwise

    for (Integer j: pn.get(8).get(8)){
        System.out.println(j);
    }

will work just fine.

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