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I have a question I am hoping someone could help with... (simplified for the purposes of explaining my question).

I have the following hash of hashes of arrays (I think that is what it is anyway?) shown using Data::Dumper.

$VAR1 = {
      'Dog' => {
                   'Colour' => [
                                'Black'
                                       ],
                   'Height' => [
                                'Tall'
                                      ],
                   'Weight' => [
                                'Fat',
                                'Huge'
                                      ],
                 }, 
      'Cat' => {
                    'Height' => [
                                 'Tiny'
                                       ]
                 },
      'Elephant' => {
                   'Colour' => [
                                'Grey'
                                      ],
                   'Height' => [
                                'Really Big'
                                            ],

                   'Weight' => [
                                'Fat',
                                'Medium',
                                'Thin'
                                      ]
                 }
        };

What I am trying to do:

This below will print the whole data structure...I want to use this kind of way to do it

my %h;

for my $animal (keys %h) {
   print "$animal\n";
   for my $attribute ( keys %{$h{$animal}} ) {
        print "\t $attribute\n";
        for my $i (0 .. $#{$h{$animal}{$attribute}} ) {
            print "\t\t$h{$animal}{$attribute}[$i]\n";
        }    
   }   
}          

The problem I am having:

I am trying to access a particular part of the hash of hashes of arrays... for example I want to only print out the Height arrays for each animal as I do not care about the other Colour, Weight attributes in this example.

I'm sure there is a simple answer to this (I know I need to specify the Height part), but what is the correct way of doing it as I have tried multiple ways that I thought would work but it hasn't.

your help is much appreciated, thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your code, instead of looping over all the attributes with

for my $attribute ( keys %{ $h{$animal} } ) { ... }

just use the one you are interested in. Like this

for my $animal (keys %h) {
   print "$animal\n";
   for my $attribute ( 'Height' ) {
        print "\t $attribute\n";
        for my $i (0 .. $#{$h{$animal}{$attribute}} ) {
            print "\t$h{$animal}{$attribute}[$i]\n";
        }    
   }   
}          

I would choose to loop over the contents of the heights array rather than the indices, making the code look like this:

for my $animal (keys %h) {
    print "$animal\n";
    print "\t\t$_\n" for @{ $h{$animal}{Height} };
}          
share|improve this answer
    
I think I may have just worked out the same kind of thing - Is the method shown in my answer also an acceptable way of doing it? - thanks a lot –  perl-user Apr 18 '13 at 10:30
    
Is it that yours is slighlty better because your not 'hard coding' the Height attribute into the loop like i have in my answer? –  perl-user Apr 18 '13 at 10:32
    
Well I wouldn't code it this way at all. I wrote this after you rejected Miguel's answer because it was too different from your original. My solution changes the minimum possible, and your own varies rather further than mine from what you had before. It was hard to tell exactly what aspects of your original code you wanted to keep. –  Borodin Apr 18 '13 at 14:25
    
When you say you 'wouldnt code it this way at all', is it a matter of your personal preference and the way you like to do it or is it that this is not the best/preferred method to go about this? thanks –  perl-user Apr 18 '13 at 14:35
    
Well a bit of both really. You use the expression $h{$animal}{$attribute} twice, which is generally considered to be bad practice. And you loop over the indices of the heights array when you don't need the indices except to access the values. I've added my take on a solution to my answer. Hopefully you will agree with me that it's an improvement. –  Borodin Apr 18 '13 at 14:52

Taking a quick look at your data structure: It's a hash of hashes of arrays! Wow. Mind officially blown.

Here's a quick way of printing out all of the data:

use feature qw(say);

# Working with a Hash of Hash of Arrays
for my $animal (keys %h) {
    say "Animal: $animal";
    # Dereference: Now I am talking about a hash of arrays
    my %animal_attributes = %{ $h{$animal} };
    for my $attribute (keys %animal_attributes) {
        # Dereference: Now I am talking about just an array
        my @attribute_value_list = @{ $animal_attributes{$attribute} };
        say "\tAttribute: $attribute - " . join ", ", @attribute_value_list;
    }
}

Note I use dereferencing. I don't have to do the dereference, but it makes the code a bit easier to work with. I don't have to think of my various levels. I know my animal is a hash of attributes, and those attributes are an array of attribute values. By using dereferencing, it allows me to keep things straight.

Now, let's say you want to print out only a list of desirable attributes. You can use the exists function to see if that attribute exists before trying to print it out.

use feature qw(say);
use constant DESIRED_ATTRIBUTES => qw(weight height sex_appeal);

# Working with a Hash of Hash of Arrays
for my $animal (keys %h) {
    say "Animal: $animal";
    # Dereference: Now I am talking about a hash of arrays
    my %animal_attributes = %{ $h{$animal} };
    for my $attribute ( DESIRED_ATTRIBUTES ) {
        if ( exists $animal_attributes{$attribute} ) {
            # Dereference: Now I am talking about just an array
            my @attribute_value_list = @{ $animal_attributes{$attribute} }; 
            say "\tAttribute: $attribute - " . join ", ", @attribute_value_list;
        }
    }
}

Same code, I just added an if clause.

When you get into these complex data structures, you might be better off using Object Oriented design. Perl has an excellent tutorial on OOP Perl. If you used that, you could have defined a class of animals and have various methods to pull out the data you want. It makes maintenance much easier and allows you to bravely create even more complex data structures without worrying about tracking where you are.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, the dereferencing explanation/comments were also very helpful –  perl-user Apr 20 '13 at 21:46

I think sometimes it's easier to use the value directly, if it is a reference to another structure. You could do something like:

my $height = "Height";

while (my ($animal, $attr) = each %h) {
    print "$animal\n";
    print "\t$height\n";
    print "\t\t$_\n" for @{ $attr->{$height} };
}

Using the value of the main keys, you can skip over one step of references and go straight at the Height attribute. The output below is after the format you had in your original code.

Output:

Elephant
        Height
                Really Big
Cat
        Height
                Tiny
Dog
        Height
                Tall
share|improve this answer

Assuming your variable is called %h:

foreach my $animal (keys %h) {
   my $heights = $h{$animal}->{Height}; #gets the Height array
   print $animal, "\n";
   foreach my $height( @$heights ) {
      print "  ", $height, "\n";
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, How could this be done using the foreach loop shown in my question? thanks. –  perl-user Apr 18 '13 at 10:20
    
Unnecessarily copies the whole @heights array. Keeping a reference, like my $heights = $h{$animal}{Height} would be preferable. –  Borodin Apr 18 '13 at 14:26

I think I have worked it out and found what I was doing wrong?

This is how I think it should be:

my %h;

for my $animal (keys %h) {
      print "$animal\n";
      for my $i (0 .. $#{$h{$animal}{Height}} ) {
          print "\t\t$h{$animal}{Height}[$i]\n";
      }    
}   
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