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Data for various stocks is coming from various stock exchange continuously. Which data structure is suitable to store these data?

things to consider are :

a) effective retrieval and update of data is required as stock data changes per second or microsecond during trading time.

I thought of using Heap as the number of stocks would be more or less constant and the most frequent used operations are retrieval and update so heap should perform well for this scenario.

b) need to show stocks which are currently trending (as in volume of shares being sold most active and least active, high profit and loss on a particular day)

I am nt sure about how to got about this.

c) as storing to database using any programming language has some latency considering the amount of stocks that will be traded during a particular time, how can u store all the transactional data persistently??

Ps: This is a interview question from Morgan Stanley.

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Doesn't sound like you did very well. –  duffymo Apr 18 '13 at 10:00

2 Answers 2

A heap doesn't support efficient random access (i.e. look-up by index) nor getting the top k elements without removing elements (which is not desired).

My answer would be something like:

A database would be the preferred choice for this, as, with a proper table structure and indexing, all of the required operations can be done efficiently.

So I suppose this is more a theoretical question about understanding of data structures (related to in-memory storage, rather than persistent).

It seems multiple data structures is the way to go:

a) Effective retrieval and update of data is required as stock data changes per second or microsecond during trading time.

A map would make sense for this one. Hash-map or tree-map allows for fast look-up.

b) How to show stocks which are currently trending (as in volume of shares being sold most active and least active, high profit and loss on a particular day)?

Just about any sorted data structure seems to make sense here (with the above map having pointers to the correct node, or pointing to the same node). One for activity and one for profit.

I'd probably go with a sorted (double) linked-list. It takes minimal time to get the first or last n items. Since you have a pointer to the element through the map, updating takes as long as the map lookup plus the number of moves of that item required to get it sorted again (if any). If an item often moves many indices at once, a linked-list would not be a good option (in which case I'd probably go for a Binary Search Tree).

c) How can you store all the transactional data persistently?

I understand this question as - if the connection to the database is lost or the database goes down at any point, how do you ensure there is no data corruption? If this is not it, I would've asked for a rephrase.

Just about any database course should cover this.

As far as I remember - it has to do with creating another record, updating this record, and only setting the real pointer to this record once it has been fully updated. Before this you might also have to set a pointer to the old record so you can check if it's been deleted if something happens after setting the pointer away, but before deletion.

Another option is having a active transaction table which you add to when starting a transaction and remove from when a transaction completes (which also stores all required details to roll back or resume the transaction). Thus, whenever everything is okay again, you check this table and roll back or resume any transactions that have not yet completed.

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While this is a language agnostic question, a few of the requirements jumped out at me. For example:

effective retrieval and update of data is required as stock data changes per second or microsecond during trading time.

The java class HashMap uses the hash code of a key value to rapidly access values in its collection. It actually has an O(1) runtime complexity, which is ideal.

need to show stocks which are currently trending (as in volume of shares being sold most active and least active, high profit and loss on a particular day)

This is an implementation based issue. Your best bet is to implement a fast sorting algorithm, like QuickSort or Mergesort.

as storing to database using any programming language has some latency considering the amount of stocks that will be traded during a particular time, how can u store all the transactional data persistently??

A database would have been my first choice, but it depends on your resources.

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NASDAQ uses SQL Server databases, and lots of them, last time I checked. Seems like a very academic question. –  duffymo Apr 18 '13 at 12:30
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You will not get far if you keep re-sorting your data all the time. And of course it’s an implementation based issue – that was the question. – The third answer is really just a capitulation. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 18 '13 at 12:39

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