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I came across this over the net while I was studying some memory leak related stuff.

int* Function()

{

   int arrays[10];

     /* Some code here */

   return &(arrays[0]);

}

The author says that the above piece of code is valid, but the memory that is returned will be reused by the next function you call, so the same memory will be used for two purposes. This is called a "hanging reference" and can cause horribly intermittent faults, or an old-fashioned "general protection fault".

It would be great if somebody can explain what is "hanging reference" & "general protection fault"

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2  
The author doesn't know C very well then, or you're misrepresenting her. The program has undefined behaviour. –  Kerrek SB Apr 18 '13 at 10:24
2  
This doesn't exactly leak memory, since the allocated array will be automatically deallocated when the function returns. This is what is meant by a hanging reference, you are returning a pointer to some memory that was allocated on the stack. When the function returns, the stack allocated array is deallocated, so that location in memory could be overwritten by data for the next function call, so dereferencing the returned pointer will give an undefined value. –  JS. Apr 18 '13 at 10:29
    
Yup looks like Hanging reference means refering to something on stack which no longer exists.Any idea about "general protection fault"? –  Keerthi Ranganath Apr 18 '13 at 10:31
1  
To expand on what @KerrekSB is talking about (his comment is the correct one), read the section of this page that says "No Traveling". C is a language for describing abstract computation; it is not a shorthand for assembly instructions. There is no behavior that C requires of this code -- it can do anything. –  Mehrdad Apr 18 '13 at 10:35
    
Just to add to what already written by others: The function is perfectly valid - it will return a pointer to the array which was allocated inside the function and now is no longer allocated. how useful is it to get a pointer to a location which is no longer allocated - that is arguable... but should you write something into a non allocated location - normally - no you shouldn't.. but if want to write a cool virus or worm or construct a memory payload - you're in the right way.. –  G.Y Apr 18 '13 at 10:41

3 Answers 3

I don't know if these are official explanations but I hope it gives some better meaning for this example:

hanging reference: the return statement returns a reference (pointer) to the arrays. However, the memory is (or can be) removed after the function closes, so there is a refererence not pointing to allocated memory, which is called a hanging reference.

This can result in a general protection fault. In general, memory that is not allocated should not be written into. If you try to do this a general protection fault can be raised by the operating system.

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arrays is allocated on the stack when Function is called. Function returns an address of a structure allocated on the stack. When Function returns the stack pointer is popped back but its data are still on stack. When the previously released region of stack will be used by another function or scope, that function will write it's local scope data into a portion of stack that is still potentially accessible from the previously returned pointer.

This has 2 consequences:

  • If you try to access arrays data from outside Function, those data are no longer reliable and will be (soon or less) corrupted by a new allocation that overwrite that stack region.
  • The new function allocated on the stack, if doesn't initialize all it's fields, could contain some dirty data

The result is undefined behavior and can depend on your compiler and compile options too.

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This doesn't exactly leak memory, since the allocated array will be automatically deallocated when the function returns. This is what is meant by a hanging reference, you are returning a pointer to some memory that was allocated on the stack. When the function returns, the stack allocated array is deallocated, so that location in memory could be overwritten by data for the next function call, so dereferencing the returned pointer will give an undefined value. This could well cause a general protection fault, as the value of the pointer could change such that it points outside of valid address space, dereffing such a pointer would cause a general protection fault.

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