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I have the following Java method:

public ERROR myMainMethod() {
  ERROR ret = invokeFirstSub();
  if (ret != ERROR.NO_ERROR) {
    return ret;
  }
  ret = invokeSecondSub();
  if (ret != ERROR.NO_ERROR) {
    return ret;
  }
  // you get the rest
}

Basically, after each sub invocation we check the return value and exit when any error occurs. How can it be refactored? The first idea was to put the whole invocation sequence inside a try-catch loop, with asserts and to catch the first AssertionError, but I don't find it quite elegant. What could be a good practice?

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1  
I personally don't think there is anything wrong with this approach. However using this you are only getting the fact that you are getting an error. What type of error ..Not known to the calling method. Rather I would encapsulate the entire block in try catch and throw an Exception to the calling block. So by default if invokeFirstSub() throws an exception everything will stop –  Rohit Apr 18 '13 at 10:40
2  
"public void" looks like a typo, shouldn't it be "public ERROR"? –  Shadow Wizard Apr 18 '13 at 11:17
    
Thank you, my bad, typo fixed :) –  András Hummer Apr 18 '13 at 11:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on refactoring good practices there are two improvements possible:

  1. Avoid multiple return statements (makes code readability clumsy for large method having many return statements)

  2. Encapsulate logic wherever possible i.e. move error checking logic as method isError() inside ERROR enum

    public ERROR myMainMethod() {

    ERROR ret = invokeFirstSub();

    ret = (ret.isError()) ? ret : invokeSecondSub();

    ret = (ret.isError()) ? ret : invokeThirdSub();

    // so on and finally

    ret = (ret.isError()) ? ret : ERROR.NO_ERROR;

    // you get the rest

    return ret; }

Further as noted strategy pattern might fit though based on feasibility in your case in managing subs one per class or all subs in a class.

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Though I would normally go with Marco's strategy pattern implementation, in this special case simplicity calls for harsh' approach. Too bad I can't accept both of your answers :( –  András Hummer Apr 22 '13 at 12:46

if your design allows it you could implement the Strategy pattern:

public interface CheckStrategy {
    ERROR invoke();
}

public class FirstCheck implements CheckStrategy {
    ERROR invoke() {
        // do something
    }
}

public class SecondCheck implements CheckStrategy {
    ERROR invoke() {
        // do something
    }
}
[...]

your main method:

public ERROR myMainMethod() {
    List<CheckStrategy> checks = new ArrayList<CheckStrategy>();
    checks.add(new FirstCheck());
    checks.add(new SecondCheck());
    [...]

    ERROR ret = ERROR.NO_ERROR;
    for(CheckStrategy check : checks) {
        ret = check.invoke();
        if(ret != ERROR.NO_ERROR) {
            break;
        }
    }

    return ret;
}
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This is good, but inside the loop you could simply return ret if it's an error (then it can be scoped inside the loop), and return the ERROR.NO_ERROR directly if the loop completes normally. I think that's better. –  Carl Manaster Apr 18 '13 at 13:43
1  
Pesonally i prefer a single point of exit. And i need the return statement at the end of the method anyways. –  Marco Forberg Apr 18 '13 at 13:49

One of the solution would be to use AOP. Depending on your technology stack you can easily achieve your goal using Spring AOP, Guice AOP or even raw AspectJ.

The idea is to define an interceptor that will intercept certain methods and execute a custom logic before and/or after the method.

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