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I have a little problem with an exercise. I have 2 classes :

The first :

namespace Abstract{

    class AbstractClass{
    public:

        virtual void setName(const std::string & _name) =0;
        virtual void print() =0;
        void DynamicCastTest(){};

    };

}

The second :

class ConcreteClass : public Abstract::AbstractClass{

    std::string type;

public:
    ConcreteClass();
    ConcreteClass(const char* a);
    ~ConcreteClass();

    static Abstract::AbstractClass* CreateConcreteClass(const char* a);

    virtual void setName(const std::string & _name); 
    virtual void print(); 

};

And the cpp file of the second class :

#include "concreteClass.h"

ConcreteClass::ConcreteClass(){
    type = "";
}

ConcreteClass::ConcreteClass(const char* a){
    type = a;
}

ConcreteClass::~ConcreteClass(){}

static ConcreteClass* CreateConcreteClass(const char* a){
    return new ConcreteClass(a);
}

void ConcreteClass::setName(const std::string & _name){
    type = _name;
}

void ConcreteClass::print(){
    std::cout<<type<<std::endl;
}

But in my main, when i call :

const char* s = "";
Abstract::AbstractClass* a = ConcreteClass::CreateConcreteClass(s);

In the compilation, Visual out me an error LNK2019 :

"public: static class ConcreteClass * __cdecl ConcreteClass::CreateConcreteClass(char const *)" (?CreateConcreteClass@ConcreteClass@@SAPAV1@PBD@Z)

on this last line. Why ?

share|improve this question
    
Wrong title: this is C++ code, not C ! And please show the full error message. –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 18 '13 at 11:59
    
What is the "symbol" that the error refers to? –  Mats Petersson Apr 18 '13 at 12:01
    
Edited with complete error code –  Apaachee Apr 18 '13 at 12:07
    
Why do you ask this Question the second time? –  Jan Herrmann Apr 18 '13 at 12:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Ah, got it:

static ConcreteClass* CreateConcreteClass(const char* a){
    return new ConcreteClass(a);
}

is not a declaration of:

ConcreteClass::CreateConcreteClass(s)

I'll leave it to you to figure out what the fix is, as it's a good learning experience, and I'm 100% sure you don't need to practice copy'n'paste - or you could just wait, because I'm sure someone else will post a "fixed" answer soon, simply because they don't care if you learn or not.

Edit: to clarify. You have declared a static member function in the class. And you have defined a static function that is not a member of any class.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not that they don't care if you learn, it's that they want reputation points for themselves. +1 for a gentle hint in the right direction. –  Matthew Walton Apr 18 '13 at 12:09
    
Hmm it's a static function so i can call it with the 'ConcreteClass::' namespace, then the function name is 'CreateConcreteClass' so for me it's the good declaration ? –  Apaachee Apr 18 '13 at 12:10
    
Well, I guess that's my answer not going to be good, as my prediction came true. Please feel free to CTRL-C + CTRL-V Shafik's answer. –  Mats Petersson Apr 18 '13 at 12:11
    
I think we should aim to both provide the answer (or how it could be solved) and explain it. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 18 '13 at 12:12
    
@sftrabbit: I have amended my answer with an explanation in words, but not a "copy-pasteable" answer. –  Mats Petersson Apr 18 '13 at 12:16

You declare CreateConcreateClass as:

   static Abstract::AbstractClass* CreateConcreteClass(const char* a);

but then later on we have this, which is a static function but not the one you declared in your class:

static ConcreteClass* CreateConcreteClass(const char* a){
    return new ConcreteClass(a);
}

the signature has to match your declaration, and so it should be this:

Abstract::AbstractClass* ConcreteClass::CreateConcreteClass(const char* a){
    return new ConcreteClass(a);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Right... I dont need to write the static word in the declaration ? –  Apaachee Apr 18 '13 at 12:13
    
The issue is Abstract::AbstractClass* ConcreteClass::CreateConcreteClass does not equal static ConcreteClass* CreateConcreteClass Even without the static, the return type is not the same. –  SlxS Apr 18 '13 at 12:19
    
@PierreBesses Actually you do not need static in your definition but you do need it in your delcaration –  Shafik Yaghmour Apr 18 '13 at 12:24

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