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This question results from advice I received in this one, namely the changing of my error code definition and going from there.

My problem: when trying to insert data into a table, I receive SQLCODE 00195 and SQLSTATE S0001. If I understand error codes correctly, a positive non-zero number means the query succeeded but with warnings. When I look at my database, no data has been inserted. I've found two resources which describe this error code as

is not a recognized built-in function name

As you'll see, the two functions used in my expression are TRIM and SHA1. If I omit both of them, the same error persists.

Using the PIC -(4)9 definition of the SQLCODE field, as suggested in my other post, returns -195 as result, also an error code I can't seem to find anything about.

I use SQL Server 2012 and Percobol, which utilizes the OpenCobol compiler.

Declaration of fields:

01 SQLCODE PIC 9(5).
01 SQLSTATE PIC X(5).

01 WS-INPUT.
        05 ACHTERNAAM PIC X(25) VALUE SPACES.
        05 VOORNAAM PIC X(15) VALUE SPACES.
        05 EMAIL PIC X(50) VALUE SPACES.
        05 LOGIN PIC X(15) VALUE SPACES.
        05 WACHTWOORD PIC X(11) VALUE SPACES.
        05 GEBR_TYPE PIC X(20) VALUE SPACES.

SQL Query:

EXEC SQL INSERT INTO dbo.Gebruikers
    VALUES ( TRIM( :LOGIN ), TRIM( :ACHTERNAAM ),
             TRIM( :EMAIL ), TRIM( :PROJECTCODE ),
             TRIM( :GEBR_TYPE ), TRIM( :VOORNAAM ),
             SHA1( TRIM( :WACHTWOORD ) ) )
END-EXEC

Database:

Table overview

Connection string:

jdbc:sqlserver://localhost\SQLEXPRESS;databaseName=Groep31;user=Groep31;password=somepw
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Solution: TRIM isn't supported in SQL Server. Using RTRIM fixed it.

Solution: SHA1 isn't supported either in SQL Server. Using HashBytes('SHA1', RTRIM(:WACHTWOORD)) fixed this (although there are some encoding issues right now).

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2  
OK, thanks for letting us know. Accept your own answer (at least when the system lets you). You must always show your SQL Codes as signed fields, as the distinction between positive and negative is very important, as you have discovered. You have also discovered what is valid SQL under in one system is not necessarily valid in another, so careful when switching from something to somethingelse. –  Bill Woodger Apr 18 '13 at 16:28

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