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How can I encapsulate a set of operations (most of which are essentially .where(...)) and apply it to different models, in a way that some of the models may not implement some of the operations and should return empty collections. (non-essential code skipped)

What I have designed (but not satisfied with):

class ActivityFinder

  def self.find(query, limit = nil)
    activities = get_activities(query)
    activities = activities.sort_by(&:created_at).reverse // some-kind of merge-sort
    activities = activities.slice(0, limit) if limit.present?
    activities
  end

  private

  def self.get_activities(query)
    activities = []
    activities += query.apply(ModelA)
    activities += query.apply(ModelB)
    activities += query.apply(ModelC)
    activities
  end
end

class ActivityQuery

  def created_before(time)
    @created_before = time
    self
  end

  def created_after(time)
    @created_after = time
    self
  end

  def apply(activity)
    activity = activity.where("#{activity.table_name}.created_at < ?", @created_before) if @created_before.present?
    activity = activity.where("#{activity.table_name}.created_at >= ?", @created_after) if @created_after.present?
    // more operations, not all of them are suported by ModelC
  rescue NoMethodError
    return []
  end
end

Usage

query = ActivityQuery.new.created_before(last_time).with_hash(...)
activities = ActivityFinder.find(query)

What I don't like:

  • the rescue for NoMethodError
  • if different models has different name for the field, it has to be handled as a case statement in the query, coupling in this way the query object with each of the models

So I'm searching for suggestions for better implementation

UPDATE

The problem is I want to pass any object that I got from an ActiveModel, e.g. ActiveRecord::Relation, so I can't just define a module with the methods (and override when needed) and include it in the models I'm using. The question is more to point in the right direction for a clean design, and not about implementation details, which I'll figure out somehow

share|improve this question
    
instead of rescuing NoMethodError, you could just do something like: def method_missing(ignored_method_name, *args); return []; end –  sockmonk Apr 18 '13 at 13:09
    
Override the method_missing of an ActiveRecord's subclass? –  Maxim Krizhanovsky Apr 18 '13 at 13:55
1  
Well, if you can't put the model specific code into the model (where it belongs), you'll end up with a tightly coupled class. –  Stefan Apr 18 '13 at 14:10
    
Darhazer, no, in the sample code the NoMethodError was being rescued in a plain class, not an ActiveRecord subclass. Regardless, I upvoded Stefan's answer. –  sockmonk Apr 18 '13 at 19:23

4 Answers 4

To avoid tight coupling, put the model specific code into the model:

class ModelA < ActiveRecord::Base
  scope :created_before, ->(timestamp) { where("created_at < ?", timestamp) }
  scope :created_after, ->(timestamp) { where("created_at >= ?", timestamp) }
  scope :with_hash, ->(hash) { ... }
end

class ModelB < ActiveRecord::Base
  scope :created_before, ->(timestamp) { where("other_column < ?", timestamp) }
  scope :created_after, ->(timestamp) { where("other_column >= ?", timestamp) }
  scope :with_hash, where('false') # empty, chain-able collection
end

Now you have a consistent interface you can program against:

class ActivityQuery

  def apply(activity)
    activity = activity.scoped
    activity = activity.created_before(@created_before) if @created_before.present?
    activity = activity.created_after(@created_after) if @created_after.present?
    activity = activity.with_hash(@hash) if @hash.present?
    activity
  end

end

No need to rescue NoMethodError and no more fiddling with the model's implementation details.

share|improve this answer
    
This means that I have to provide a with_hash method to each object that actually does not support hash. I would like to create a mixin that provides default implementations to all of those methods. But it does not work when I pass ModelA.includes(:some_relation) to the query object –  Maxim Krizhanovsky Apr 19 '13 at 6:06
    
Or you could just check if activity.responds_to?(:with_hash) –  Stefan Apr 19 '13 at 7:25
    
does not work, because rails provides method_missing method –  Maxim Krizhanovsky Apr 19 '13 at 7:38
    
There must be another reason, respond_to? doesn't invoke method_missing. –  Stefan Apr 19 '13 at 7:50
    
There's a typo in my first comment, it's respond_to? (without s). responds_to? (with s) is undefined and therefore handled by method_missing. –  Stefan Apr 19 '13 at 8:27

You can use ActiveRecord::Base#column_names

class Goodstuff < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.find_x_greater_than_y(x,y)
    if (scope_attributes + column_names).inlcude?(x)
      where('x > y')
    else
      []
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
as far as I know, try() will send message to the object, unless the object is nil, and will result in NoMethodError if the object exists but does not have .where method? –  Maxim Krizhanovsky Apr 18 '13 at 12:26
    
Oh, you are correct. So let me edit and give you the last option only. –  fotanus Apr 18 '13 at 12:28
    
@Darhazer also was missing an include? call afterwards the column_names. –  fotanus Apr 18 '13 at 12:30
    
it's not just the column names, I may use custom scope or other finder methods... –  Maxim Krizhanovsky Apr 18 '13 at 12:31
    
for scope you can use valid_scope_name?. What is the problem with the finder methods? Isn't enough to use an scope or attribute on it? –  fotanus Apr 18 '13 at 13:01

If you want to encapsulate your query objects, I have written a micro library that makes it really simple to move complex query logic outside of your models and controllers.

https://github.com/ElMassimo/queryable

It takes care of making your scopes chainable, and delegating methods like each and map to the actual query.

You could create a base object where you define the available operations (or rescue the NoMethodError), and then extend the query object if you need to modify or change any of the scopes.

ActivityFinder.find { |activities|
  activities.created_before(last_time).with_hash(...)
}

class ActivityQuery
  include Queryable::ActiveRecord

  # You can define the scopes as simple methods, which you can override in
  # subclasses.
  def created_before(time)
    where("created_at < ?", time)
  end

  # Rails-style scope syntax is also available
  scope(:created_after) { |time| where("created_at >= ?", time) }

  # You can add more methods to the query interface that just return self,
  # or none and then implement them in the more specific query subclasses.
  def with_hash(*args, &block)
    none
  end
end

class ModelAQuery < ActivityQuery
  # You can specify the collection that the query object works with by default.
  queryable ModelA

  # You can override a method defined in the superclass, since the scopes are
  # plain methods you could also share them with mixins.
  def created_before(time)
    where("measured_at < ?", time)
  end

  def with_hash(hash)
    where("timestamp = ?", hash[:timestamp])
  end

  # ...
end

# To solve that particular case you could pass a block to the find method
# and build the query.
class ActivityFinder
  ACTIVITIES = [ModelAQuery, ModelBQuery, ...]

  def self.find(limit=nil, &block)
    activities = get_activities(&block)
    # ...
  end

  def self.get_activities
    ACTIVITIES.map { |query_class| yield query_class.new }.flatten
  end
end
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The original idea was to create some proxy object and defer method execution until the actual apply. I did it with more traditional approach, where each operation creates a criterion object (in my case it's called QueryOperation) and it's applied at later stage. The same functional issues still exists, but the code is much cleaner

class ActivityQuery

  def initialize
    @operations = []
    @operations.push(QueryOperationOrderBy.new('created_at', 'DESC'))
  end

  def for_user(user)
    @user = user
    self
  end

  def with_hash(hash)
    @operations.push(QueryOperationFindByHash.new(hash)) unless hash.blank?
    self
  end

  def limit(limit)
    @operations.push(QueryOperationLimit.new(limit))
    self
  end

  def created_before(time)
    @operations.push(QueryOperationLessThan.new('created_at', time))
    self
  end

  def created_after(time)
    @operations.push(QueryOperationGreaterThan.new('created_at', time))
    self
  end

  def apply(activity)
    @operations.each do |operation|
      activity = operation.apply(activity)
    end

    activity
  rescue NoMethodError
    return []
  end
end
share|improve this answer

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