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I want to sort a list at first by a value and then by a second value. Is there an easy way to do this? Here is a small example:

A = [{'name':'john','age':45},
     {'name':'andi','age':23},
     {'name':'john','age':22},
     {'name':'paul','age':35},
     {'name':'john','age':21}]

This command is for sorting this list by 'name':

sorted(A, key = lambda user: user['name'])

But how I can sort this list by a second value? Like 'age' in this example.

I want a sorting like this (first sort by 'name' and then sort by 'age'):

andi - 23
john - 21
john - 22
john - 45
paul - 35

Thanks!

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5  
On a side not: python's sort is guaranteed to be stable, thus you could simply sort by age and then by name to obtain the result you wanted. (note that the keys are in reverse order. you first sort by the second key and then by the first). –  Bakuriu Apr 18 '13 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 59 down vote accepted
>>> A = [{'name':'john','age':45},
     {'name':'andi','age':23},
     {'name':'john','age':22},
     {'name':'paul','age':35},
     {'name':'john','age':21}]
>>> sorted(A, key = lambda user: (user['name'], user['age']))
[{'age': 23, 'name': 'andi'}, {'age': 21, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 22, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 45, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 35, 'name': 'paul'}]

This sorts by a tuple of the two attributes, the following is equivalent and much faster/cleaner:

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> sorted(A, key=itemgetter('name', 'age'))
[{'age': 23, 'name': 'andi'}, {'age': 21, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 22, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 45, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 35, 'name': 'paul'}]

From the comments: @Bakuriu

I bet there is not a big difference between the two, but itemgetter avoids a bit of overhead because it extracts the keys and make the tuple during a single opcode(CALL_FUNCTION), while calling the lambda will have to call the function, load the various constants(which are other bytecodes) finally call the subscript (BINARY_SUBSCR), build the tuple and return it... that's a lot more work for the interpreter.

To summarize: itemgetter keeps the execution fully on the C level, so it's as fast as possible.

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3  
I would be interested in an explanation why itemgetter would be much faster than the lambda expression. Doesn't it boil down to the same lookups? –  catchmeifyoutry Apr 18 '13 at 15:03
4  
@catchmeifyoutry I bet there is not a big difference between the two, but itemgetter avoids a bit of overhead because it extracts the keys and make the tuple during a single opcode(CALL_FUNCTION), while calling the lambda will have to call the function, load the various constants(which are other bytecodes) finally call the subscript (BINARY_SUBSCR), build the tuple and return it... that's a lot more work for the interpreter –  Bakuriu Apr 18 '13 at 16:54
    
@Bakuriu Thanks, for the explanation. So the itemgetter implementation is optimized in cpython as c code, not just implemented as the reference python code mentioned in its online documentation. –  catchmeifyoutry Apr 19 '13 at 11:39
3  
@catchmeifyoutry Yes. Note that the documentation says that it is equivalent to that python code, not that it is implemented that way. In particular itemgetter is really a type (see type(operator.itemgetter)) so it's not even a real function. This is typical: a lot of built-ins are implemented in C and often they are types and not functions(e.g. enumerate). –  Bakuriu Apr 19 '13 at 12:03
from operator import itemgetter

sorted(your_list, key=itemgetter('name', 'age'))
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Do you wonder whether operator.itemgetter does something nearly magic? It does not. It returns a tuple (of length two in this case) and then sorted does The Right Thing with that. –  Lutz Prechelt Apr 14 at 13:37

Here is the alternative general solution - it sorts elements of dict by keys and values. The advantage of it - no need to specify keys, and it would still work if some keys are missing in some of dictionaries.

def sort_key_func(item):
    """ helper function used to sort list of dicts

    :param item: dict
    :return: sorted list of tuples (k, v)
    """
    pairs = []
    for k, v in item.items():
        pairs.append((k, v))
    return sorted(pairs)
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