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(I'm a little hopeless about this question, since I haven't found any article pointing to what I want).

Anyways:

Is there any way to share a single ISessionFactory (SessionFactoryImpl) between multiple AppDomains?

-- Or --

Is it possible to spawn ISessions from this ISessionFactory and serialize the new created ISession to a different Appdomain?

-- Or --

In a Winforms-based application, what is your success story about ISessionFactory / ISession management, regarding to startup times and memory consumption?

The long story (for those who prefer the details):

  • My application is an ERP Winforms based and can spawns multiple 'sub-applications' (forms);
  • Each sub-application have its own assembly, which can be updated independently;
  • Spawning a new AppDomain would be great to isolate static members of each 'sub-application'. When the application is finished, the sub-program AppDomain resources could be unloaded as well. We did that for a while, but since the SessionFactory is costly (in time and mainly in memory), this model started to become untenable (For now, we are using threads and ThreadStatic members to hold particular information of each sub-app);
  • We are pretty much propped on Lazy-loading, so we can't give up from this feature also.

What I have already tried:

  • MarshalByRef class that shares the ISessionFactory: I couldn't get this to work (can't remember why), but serializing the ISessionFactory would cause a duplication of memory (a big amount) anyways. Am I right?
  • MarshalByRef class that spawns ISession and serialize it to the other AppDomain: Since an ISession holds it properties on its parent ISessionFactory, that is now in other boundaries, it brought to me some nice expcetions telling me some properties were not defined.
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1 Answer 1

My success story with a Winforms app is that we serialize the configuration the first time the application is run and the serialized file is loaded on subsequent runs. This significantly reduces application startup time. It might even be possible to distribute the application with a serialized configuration to eliminate the lag on first run.

The serialization looks something like this:

    private const string SERIALIZED_CONFIG = "configuration.bin";

    private Configuration GetConfiguration()

        Configuration config = null;
        config = LoadConfigurationFromFile();

        if (config == null)
        {
            // Create a new configuration, code omitted
            config = fluentConfig.BuildConfiguration();            
            SaveConfigurationToFile(config);
        }
    }

    private Configuration LoadConfigurationFromFile()
    {
        try
        {
            if (!IsConfigurationFileValid())
            {
                return null;
            }

            using (var file = File.Open(SERIALIZED_CONFIG, FileMode.Open))
            {
                var bf = new BinaryFormatter();
                return bf.Deserialize(file) as Configuration;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            return null;
        }
    }

    private bool IsConfigurationFileValid()
    {
        if (!File.Exists(SERIALIZED_CONFIG))
        {
            return false;
        }

        var configInfo = new FileInfo(SERIALIZED_CONFIG);

        // Assumes all assemblies are in same location and written at same time
        var asm = _assemblies.First();
        var asmInfo = new FileInfo(asm.Location);

        if (asmInfo.LastWriteTime > configInfo.LastWriteTime)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    private void SaveConfigurationToFile(Configuration config)
    {

        using (var file = File.Open(SERIALIZED_CONFIG, FileMode.Create))
        {
            var bf = new BinaryFormatter();
            bf.Serialize(file, config);
        }
    }
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1  
This only reduces the time to create a SessionFactory, but not its memory consumption. And it seems like memory is the biggest issue of the OP. –  cremor Apr 19 '13 at 7:25
    
+1 For your code sample. Thank you for that. I'm already aware of this possibility (NHiberante Cfg Serialization) - there are some examples on the web. But @cremor is right: it solves part of the speed-up time and won't help in any manner about the memory consumption. Thank you for the prompt answer anyway. :) –  J.Hudler Apr 19 '13 at 14:02
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