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Consider the following code HTML + JavaScript:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<p id="demo">Click the button to display a date after changing the hours, minutes, and seconds.</p>

<button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
 <script>
 function myFunction()
  {
  var d = new Date();
  d.setHours(0,0,0,0);
  document.write(d + '<br/>');
  document.write('ISO Date '+ d.toISOString() + '<br/>');
  //I want it to be 2013-04-17T00:00:00.000Z
  }
 </script>
</body>
</html>

Output:

Thu Apr 18 2013 00:00:00 GMT+0530 (India Standard Time)
ISO Date 2013-04-17T18:30:00.000Z

Could anyone help on understanding this difference in Date & Time

share|improve this question
up vote 18 down vote accepted
var d = new Date();
d.setHours(-12, d.getTimezoneOffset(), 0, 0); //removing the timezone offset and 12 hours
console.log(d.toISOString()); //2013-04-17T00:00:00.000Z

I don't know, why would you need a ISO date a day earlier, but in case it is a typo:

var d = new Date();
d.setHours(0, -d.getTimezoneOffset(), 0, 0); //removing the timezone offset.
console.log(d.toISOString()); //2013-04-18T00:00:00.000Z
share|improve this answer
    
In the second example, I believe that it should be d.getTimezoneOffset(). The offset can be negative or positive. The negation will create an addition if the value is negative. – dbasch Jul 7 '14 at 4:47
    
@dbasch thats the point. If the value is negative, then you are behind UTC0, so you need to add the hours to your local time. – Artyom Neustroev Jul 7 '14 at 6:15
2013-18-04 00:00:00 GMT+0530
2013-17-04 18:30:00 GMT+0000

These are the two timestamps. The first one has a time zone, the second one is GMT (no time zone adjustment). If you take the second timestamp and add 05:30:00 to 18:30:00 you get midnight of the following day. That matches the first timestamp.

share|improve this answer
1  
Worth noting the comment within OP's code: //I want it to be 2013-04-17T00:00:00.000Z. I think he's looking for a way to prevent .toISOString() converting from GMT+0530 to GMT+0000. – James Donnelly Apr 18 '13 at 13:34
    
@JamesDonnelly: You are right... I got the answer from Artyom Neustroev i.e. removing the timezone offset. any way thanks to everyone for your time – Amol M Kulkarni Apr 18 '13 at 13:58
    
Those "GMT" suffixes aren't time zones, but offsets. They tell you nothing about daylight saving time adjustments. – Suncat2000 Jun 30 at 15:05

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