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In the following class:

MGTileMenu

various extern NSString's are defined in the following way for use as notifications:

.h

extern NSString *MGTileMenuWillDisplayNotification; // menu will be shown

.m

NSString *MGTileMenuWillDisplayNotification;

It gets used as follows:

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:MGTileMenuWillDisplayNotification 
                                                    object:self 
                                                  userInfo:nil];

My question is this: The extern NSString MGTileMenuWillDisplayNotification never gets initialized to any value - but this code works. I would have expected the implementation in the .m file to be:

NSString *MGTileMenuWillDisplayNotification = @"MGTileMenuWillDisplayNotification";

Why is this not necessary and what is going on here?

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1 Answer

This means that the actual variable is defined in other parts of the program. Probably within some framework or library. You do not even have to have the related source.

The extern keyword tells the linker to look up the symbol table for a symbol named MGTileMenuWillDisplayNotification . (I think that would be a static variable, but not sure whether it coud be something else.)

NSString* tells the compiler to tread the memory where your pointer points to as NSString object. As usual. It is just that it is declared somewhere else and most probalby properly initialized somewhere else. It is in your scope of responsibility to ensure that it really is an NSString object which the documentation of the framework/library should tell you.

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But there is a static variable NSString *MGTileMenuWillDisplayNotification; in MGTileMenuController.m, and the value is nil. –  Martin R Apr 18 '13 at 14:39
    
Well, that's the one. It is initialized with nil. –  Hermann Klecker Apr 18 '13 at 15:00
    
but the var isn't initialized elsewhere, so it's (implicitly) nil - how can posting a nil notification work then? –  Brynjar Apr 19 '13 at 8:54
    
so after checking this with a few breakpoints (which I should have done to begin with..) sending notifs with nil initialised strings doesn't work, so it's just a bug in that class's code. –  Brynjar Apr 24 '13 at 9:30
    
I am glad you found it in the end. –  Hermann Klecker Apr 24 '13 at 11:53
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