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I'm playing around with threads and I don't understand why this isn't working as I thought.

I am trying to calculate a sum using threads and was expecting for the thread pool to wait for all tasks to finish by the time I print out the result (due to the shutdown() call and the isTerminated() check).

What am I missing here?

import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class Test5 {

private Integer sum= new Integer(0);

public static void main(String[] args) {

    ExecutorService pool = Executors.newCachedThreadPool(); 
    Test5 obj = new Test5();

    for(int i=0; i<1000; i++){
            pool.execute(obj.new Adding());
    }

    pool.shutdown();

    while(!pool.isTerminated()) {
        //could be empty loop...
        System.out.println(" Is it done? : " + pool.isTerminated());
    }

    System.out.println(" Is it done? : " + pool.isTerminated());
    System.out.println("Sum is " + obj.sum);                
}

class Adding implements Runnable {

    public void run() {

        synchronized(this) {

            int tmp = sum;
            tmp+=1;
            sum=new Integer(tmp);           
        }                       
    }               
}
}

While I do get good results, I also get output such as this:

Is it done? : true
Sum is 983
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have a number of issues.

  1. Your code is not threadsafe
  2. Busy waiting is an anti-pattern to be avoided.

What do i mean by 1.?

Lets suppose we have two threads, A & B.

  1. A reads sum into tmp as 1
  2. B reads sum into tmp as 1
  3. A increments sum to 2
  4. A writes sum as 2
  5. B increments sum to 2
  6. B writes sum as 2

So we end up with 2 after two increments. No quite right.

Now you may say "but I have used synchronized, this should not happen". Well, you haven't.

When you create your Adding instances you new each one. You have 1000 separate Adding instances.

When you synchronized(this) you are synchronizing on the current instance, not across all Adding. So your synchronized block does nothing.

Now, the simple solution would be to use synchronized(Adding.class).

The synchronized(Adding.class) will make the code block synchronized correctly across all Adding instances.

The good solution would be to use an AtmoicInteger rather than an Integer as this increments atomically and is designed for exactly this sort of task.

Now onto 2.

You have a while(thing){} loop, this basically runs the thread like crazy testing thousands of times a millisecond until thing is true. This is a huge waste of CPU cycles. An ExecutorService has a special, blocking, method that waits until it has shutdown, awaitTermination.

Here is an example:

static final AtomicInteger sum = new AtomicInteger(0);

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {

    ExecutorService pool = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        pool.execute(new Adding());
    }

    pool.shutdown();
    pool.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.DAYS);

    System.out.println(" Is it done? : " + pool.isTerminated());
    System.out.println("Sum is " + sum);
}

static class Adding implements Runnable {

    public void run() {
        sum.addAndGet(1);
    }
}

I would also suggest not using a cachedThreadPool in this circumstance as you have 1000 Runnables being submitted and this will generate far more Threads than you have CPUs. I would suggest using newFixedThreadPool with a sane number of Threads.

I'm not even going to go into the use of int literals and Integer and why new Integer() is not needed.

share|improve this answer
1  
Normal increments are typically atomic. The problem likely has to do with thread caching and I believe he could get the same effect as your code snippet by adding the volatile keyword to his sum variable, forcing a direct memory lookup like AtomicInteger does. – Jesan Fafon Apr 18 '13 at 14:22
1  
You are right, modern JVMs do implement int++ atomically. But the OP's code would not work with volatile due to the use of tmp. Furthermore the JLS provides no guarantees of the atomicity of incrementation so it is best not to assume that the implementation is the same across all platforms. – Boris the Spider Apr 18 '13 at 14:23
    
Wow, there is so much more to this. Thanks for making it a bit more clear. – Mihai Ocneanu Apr 18 '13 at 14:43

You need to sync on the main object instance. I'm using int below, Integer will work too (needs to initialized to zero explicitly).

Here is the working code

import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class AppThreadsSum {

    int sum;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        ExecutorService pool = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

        AppThreadsSum app = new AppThreadsSum();

        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            pool.execute(app.new Adding());
        }

        pool.shutdown();

        while (!pool.isTerminated()) {
            System.out.println(" Is it done? : " + pool.isTerminated());
        }

        System.out.println(" Is it done? : " + pool.isTerminated());
        System.out.println("Sum is " + app.sum);
    }

    class Adding implements Runnable {

        public void run() {

            synchronized (AppThreadsSum.this) {

                sum += 1;
            }
        }
    }
}

p.s. Busy waiting is an anti-pattern to be avoided (copied from the neighbor answer to be complete and aware of this important thing, see comments)

share|improve this answer
    
You should explain what volatile does for the OP. – Jesan Fafon Apr 18 '13 at 14:29
    
I would really recommend against busy-waiting. This should never be done. – Boris the Spider Apr 18 '13 at 14:32
    
@JesanFafon oops, volatile is not needed here since synchronized is used. volatile ensures that the value is not copied to the thread local area and the same value is available to all threads. – Vitaly Apr 18 '13 at 14:33
    
@bmorris591 yes, but the question was about why "it's not waiting". It actually waited but the synchronization happened on the wrong object. – Vitaly Apr 18 '13 at 14:35
    
Yeah, it will wait - but it will busy wait. I think it's good to point these things out as and when they arise otherwise you may one day find this code in your own code pool... – Boris the Spider Apr 18 '13 at 14:37

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