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Checkout Pinterest's splash page - **(Make sure that your logged out of your account or you wont see the splash page.) The image of a Macbook at the bottom, It's responsive and shrinks and expands depending on the size of the broweser window.

Silly question... how do they do it? and how can this be done using Twitter Bootstrap?

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Are you asking this? stackoverflow.com/a/15641047/1004046 – Pigueiras Apr 18 '13 at 15:38
    
@Pigueiras No. I'm talking about there main landing page which has an image of a Macbook pro at the bottom. You have to be logged out of your Pinterest account or linked account (facebook) in order to see it. – zoops Apr 18 '13 at 15:59
    
@espooz its being done by js likely jquery, using chrome you can see the style element change on the image as you change you height, my guess would be jquery listening to screen change, updating size accordingly – AbstractChaos Apr 18 '13 at 16:39

If you look at the <script> blocks on the page, you can see how it's done. It's basically just a resize listener. Here's a simplified version:

var htAboveImage = $content.height(),
    naturalImageHt = 450,
    padding = 150,
    minImageHt = 100;

var changeFunc = function() {
    var windowHt = $window.height();
    var imageHt = Math.min(
                      Math.max(windowHt - htAboveImage - padding, minImageHt)
                      naturalImageHt,
                  );
    $image.height(imageHt);
};
changeFunc();
$(window).on("resize", changeFunc);

There's no need to update the width too, because <img>s automatically resize proportionately when you size only one dimension in CSS. But the full code on Pinterest also updates padding on the content above the image to keep it vertically centered.

By the way: Chrome's Developer Tools are your friend when it comes to questions like this! Making careful use of these tools, it takes only a minute to see what's going on:

  1. Right-click image > Inspect Element
  2. Resize the window and notice that there's an explicit height in px being set on the tag, updating continuously. Must be done by JS. But who's setting it?
  3. Right-click tag > Break on... > Attributes Modifications
  4. Resize window again and hit breakpoint
  5. Top of the call stack is buried in minified jQuery code – probably just generic code for setting a CSS property. What's the highest non-jQuery piece of code on the stack?
  6. There's the code!
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