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This is more of an abstract question really. How can I be sure that I don't miss a WebSocket's open event? As I understand it, the browser starts establishing a connection as soon as I call the constructor, so if things go badly, an open (or error) event might be fired before my handlers for those events are connected.

var socket = new WebSocket("ws://www.example.com");
/*Because I'm an unlucky guy, the open-event fires before the next line*/
socket.addEventListener("open", function(event){...});

In this case, my open-Handler would never be called. Most likely this is never a real problem because establishing the connection takes longer than executing the next line of JavaScript. However, the same could be said for XMLHttpRequest, and there the recommended order of things is:

var ajax = new XMLHttpRequest();
ajax.addEventListener("load", function(event){...});
ajax.open();
ajax.send();

This makes sure that the event can not be lost. Why is WebSocket different in that respect? Am I overlooking something and missing the event is not really an issue?

Thank you for some clarification on this.

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marked as duplicate by leggetter, Ian, Nija, cale_b, Tim B Apr 3 '14 at 16:16

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your second example with Ajax has a faulty assumption. With Ajax, there is no actual problem putting your event handler after the send call, as long as both are included in the same synchronous set of operations. Here's a fiddle that sends the Ajax request, burns several seconds (plenty of time for the fetch to complete) and then attaches listeners. As you can see, the events fire just fine.

So, this is okay:

var ajax = new XMLHttpRequest();
ajax.open();
ajax.send();
ajax.addEventListener("load", function(event){...});

Due to the single-threaded nature of browser JavaScript, the load event does not actually fire until the current code is finished running. (NOTE: maybe this behavior is different in older browsers, but it's certainly how it works in any browser that supports WebSockets.)

This, however, is not okay:

var ajax = new XMLHttpRequest();
ajax.open();
ajax.send();
setTimeout(function() {
    ajax.addEventListener("load", function(event){...});
}, 1000);

This is because you've created a race condition between two asynchronous actions: the setTimeout resolution and the load event firing. As long as your delay between firing the Ajax request and setting the listener is in the same synchronous execution, there is no risk of "missing" an Ajax event.

It works the same way with WebSockets -- you can't miss the open event as long as you construct the WebSocket and attach your listener in the same synchronous set of instructions. Here's another fiddle that does an analogous synchronous wait for a WebSocket. As you can see, even after waiting several seconds to attach the event listener, it still fires.

I'm not sure where the practice of "attach listeners before you act" comes from. Perhaps it was important in older browsers, or perhaps it is important for some APIs other than Ajax. Whatever the reason the practice came about, you don't actually need to adhere to it in modern browsers for either Ajax or WebSockets.

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Thanks, that's exactly the answer I was looking for! I knew I was overlooking something, but I just couldn't put a finger on it. I never considered that lack of multi-threading would make the whole thing a non-issue. –  user2295759 Apr 18 '13 at 16:30

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