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class Test {
    public Test(string name, string age) {
    }
}

interface ITest
        ????????

class Example: ITest {
    public Example(/* ... */) {
    }
}

So what should I use in my interface to use the same parameters in my example as in test?

What I want to do:

  • I have 3 classes: a, b and c.

  • I want my c to inherit from both a and b.

But C# doesn't let you do that ... So I want to use an interface.

EDIT My classes are:

  • Student(name, age, studies)
  • Teacher(name, age, classes)
  • Working Student/Teacher(name, age, studied/classes, payment)

So i want to use methods in my working class from the other classes.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by J0HN, Andrew Barber Apr 19 '13 at 6:47

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Your question is very unclear. –  Ken Kin Apr 18 '13 at 16:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Interfaces are used as a contract for classes that inherit it. This means any public methods/properties you want the interface to expose, must also be exposed in the inherited class.

In the case above, you don't have any public methods/properties exposed in the interface. Let me show you an example.

Interface ITest
{
   void AddPerson(string name, string age);
}

Interface IPerson
{
    string ReturnPersonsAge(string name);
}

/// This must expose the AddPerson method
/// This must also expose the ReturnPersonByAge method
class Example : ITest, IPerson
{
   Dictionary<string, string> people = new Dictionary<string, string>();

   void AddPerson(string name, string age)
   {
      people.Add(name, age);
   }

   string ReturnPersonsAge(string name)
   {
      return people[name];
   }
}

I hope that helps, but feel free to ask more questions so I can help narrow down your question.

share|improve this answer
    
hey, What i want to do: I have 3 classes -> a, b and c I want my C to inherit from both a and b. But c# doesn't let you do that... So i want to use a interface. –  user1765216 Apr 18 '13 at 16:07
    
i thought you can't inherence from more then 1 class ?? –  user1765216 Apr 18 '13 at 16:09
    
Sorry Multiple Inheritence is not allowed, but you are allowed to inherit from multiple INTERFACES, which is slightly different. See edit. –  Kyle C Apr 18 '13 at 16:14
    
Yea i knew that i had to use interfaces =D Ty for your answer nonetheless –  user1765216 Apr 18 '13 at 16:22

Interfaces can't define constructors. There certainly is other way to do it, depends on what you want to achive.

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Interface IAClass
{
  void Add(string s);
}
Interface IBClass
{
  void Delete(string m);
}


Class A: IAClass
{
  void Add(string name)
{
  // Your Logic
}
}

Class B: IBClass
{
  void Delete(string name)
{
  // Your Logic
}
}

Class C:IAClass,IBClass
{
     void Add(string name)
{
  // Your Logic
}

 void Delete(string name)
{
  // Your Logic
}
}
share|improve this answer

You can expose them as properties in the interface

Interface ITest
{
string Name{get;set;}
string Age{get;set;}
}
share|improve this answer
    
And if i use Public Test(params string[] parameters) –  user1765216 Apr 18 '13 at 16:01

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