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I am migrating a VC++/SQL server app to using Oracle. The database access is implemented using ADO classes, and I can't find a way to go through the cursor that is returned by Oracle.

The sproc is something like:

create or replace PROCEDURE GetSettings
(
  cv_1 OUT SYS_REFCURSOR
)
AS
BEGIN
   OPEN  cv_1 FOR
      SELECT KEY ,
             VALUE 
        FROM Settings;
END;

The code is something like:

      _CommandPtr pCommand;
      _ParameterPtr pParam1;

      HRESULT hr = pCommand.CreateInstance (__uuidof (Command));

      if (FAILED (hr))
           return;

      pCommand->ActiveConnection = m_pConn;
      pCommand->CommandText = "GetSettings";
      pCommand->CommandType = adCmdStoredProc;
      _RecordsetPtr pRecordset;
      hr = pRecordset.CreateInstance (__uuidof (Recordset));
      if (FAILED (hr))
           return;

      pRecordset = pCommand->Execute(NULL,NULL,adCmdStoredProc);

(in fact it is using the ADO classes from http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/1075/A-set-of-ADO-classes-version-2-20#TheSample02 )

The returned pRecordset is in a closed state and you cannot do anything with it. I imagine I should pass some parameter for the cursor, but how do you create/use/access the returned cursor using these ADO functions? There is no cursor parameter type that I can see

I am completely stuck and would greatly appreciate some help

Thanks

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Finally found out how to do it, you need specify special parameters in the connection string to tell it to return result set:

Provider=ORAOLEDB.ORACLE;User ID=xxx;Password=xxx;Data Source=tns_name;OLEDB.Net=True;PLSQLRSet=True;

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