Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a test suite of some 6 classes, with a total of 120 tests between them.

The issue I face is that some tests cannot be run when some other tests are running. For example, for tests a,b,c,d,e,f:

  • a cannot be run with b or c
  • b cannot be run with a or c
  • c cannot be run with a or b
  • d cannot be run with f
  • e can be run with anything
  • f cannot be run with d

This is a small example, but hopefully it illustrates the point. I still want to exploit as much parallelism as possible, for example a d and e could all be running at the same time. I am still learning with testNG, but I have tried the following things:

Grouping the tests that cannot be run together into a single group - I couldn't find a way to run testNG in a 'parallel="groups"' mode, like for 'parallel="classes"' where all tests in a group run in the same thread. Putting each test that cannot be run together in a single class would allow 'parallel="classes"' to work, but would mean the tests would not be arranged by test functionality, as they currently are.

Put dependencies around the tests - I considered having each test depend on one other (possibly with groups?), forming a chain such as a->b->c. The issue with this is that these will always run in that order, which might hide issues. Another problem here is that test maintainence becomes an issue, as you have to ensure the chain is singular and doesn't break!

Creating a Method Interceptor that sorts the list by group - I'm not entirely sure on this one, but I don't think it would prevent having a test already running whilst another incompatible test is selected as 'next to run'.

I've seen TestNG & Selenium: Separate tests into "groups", run ordered inside each group that seems to be attempting the same goal, but for different reasons, so the solution reached there isn't suitable as its not a dependency issue, but an isolation issue.

Is there something that will help me?

Thanks very much,

Phil

share|improve this question
    
Can you give a more concrete example of these tests? Instead of test A cannot be run with B or C, what actual test are you talking about? –  Arran Apr 18 '13 at 16:18
    
Apologies, the tests i named a->f are tests that I've written, each testing a function of our application. The application under test controls physical resources. Each test specifies a physical resource to use, and asks the resource to perform a particular function. Some tests use the same resource, and those are the ones that cannot be run together. Does that help? –  Obiphil Apr 19 '13 at 11:18
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could refactor the tests such that your current list of classes are no longer marked as tests. Instead, introduce new test proxy classes whose methods simply call the testing procedures in the original classes. That way, maintaining the code in the functional area is straightforward. Alternatively, since the proxy classes are based on the type of resources they use, you could put them into separate tests within the suite and use parallel="tests".

In fact, you don't have to introduce those proxy classes. You could specify your tests as

<test name="boiler">
   <classes>
      <class name="org.example.A">
         <methods>
            <include name="a1"/>
            <include name="a2"/>
         </methods
      </class>
      ... <!-- list of methods that use the boiler -->
   </classes>
</test>
<test name="waterheater">
    <classes>
      <class name="org.example.B">
         <methods>
            <include name="b"/>
         </methods>
      </class>
       ... <!-- list of methods that use the waterheater -->
   </classes>
</test>

The advantage of using the proxy classes is that listing out the tests can be done at the class level instead of the method level. Your mileage may vary.

<test name="boiler">
   <classes>
      <class name="org.example.BoilerProxy"/>
   </classes>
</test>
<test name="waterheater">
   <classes>
       <class name="org.example.WaterHeaterProxy"/>
   </classes>
</test>
...

The issue with this is that these will always run in that order, which might hide issues.

TestNG will almost always run a sequence of tests in exactly the same order each time. I believe it is a flaw in your design if you look to uncover bugs when things run in different orders, using the facilities of TestNG. There are no shortcuts to mapping out the combinations of sequences that might occur and explicitly test for them, or at least a manageable subset of them. In this light, setting up proxy tests, as described in the first paragraph may be your best bet, as you can then repeat and re-order them as needed.

Testing parallelism, asynchrony and race conditions is hard. There are no shortcuts except, perhaps, good design.

I have created a blog posting based on this answer: http://ancient-marinator.blogspot.com/2013/05/on-testing-scheduling-your-tests.html

share|improve this answer
    
Great idea, thanks! I hadn't considered using Tests in this way, and I can extend your idea to have each 'Test' be a group, then annotate the tests that can't run together to be in groups together, thus reducing maintenance issues. –  Obiphil Apr 29 '13 at 9:20
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.