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This is what i have to do: Display the content of the files given as arguments as follows: the files on the positions 1, 3, 5, ... will be displayed normally. The files on the positions 2, 4, 6, ... print each line with the words in revers order (last word is displayed first, next to last is displayed second, etc).

I tryed in many ways but i can't figure out how to verify the position of the filename in the awk arguments list.

if(j%2!=0){
    for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)
            print $i
       }
else
    for(i=NF;i=1;i--)
            print $i
    }

This is how i can print the lines from a file.

BEGIN{
 for(j=1;j<ARGC;j++)
    a[j]=j
}

Here i tried to make a list with the number of arguments.

But how can i use the list with the if? Or how can i do this in a different way?

$ awk -f 2.awk 1.txt 2.txt 3.txt

This is the command i used, where 2.awk is the source file.

Text file example: 1.txt

1 2 3 4

a b c b
share|improve this question
    
Can you give some examples for the text files? I think you should be able to make a couple of associative arrays of the filenames in the BEGIN and then test FILENAME in the array you want to perform the output in the main block. – n0741337 Apr 18 '13 at 16:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, you can massage this to your needs. Heres an awk executable file that you would run like:

awkex 1.txt 2.txt 3.txt

The contents of the executable awkex file are:

awk '
BEGIN {
    for( i = 1; i < ARGC; i++ )
        {
        if( i % 2 == 0 ) { even_args[ ARGV[ i ] ] = ARGV[ i ]; }
        else { odd_args[ ARGV[ i ] ] = ARGV[ i ]; }
        }
    }
{
    if( odd_args[ FILENAME ] != "" )
        {
        for( i = 1; i <= NF; i++ )
            printf( "%s ", $i );
        printf( "\n" );
        }
    else
        {
        for( j = NF; j > 0; j-- )
            printf( "%s ", $j );
        printf( "\n" );
        }
}
' $*

It's assuming every arg is a filename. The odd ones got into one map, the evens into another map. If the currently handled FILENAME is in the odd array, do one thing, else do the other. It's also assuming the default separator. You could change that with the -F flag in the "awkex" file.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx man... this is really helpfull... i'm just a beginner and i tried and studied about 3 hours for this program and it was impossible for me. But, if i don't ask too much, can you explain me please the first part? the BEGIN i mean – Tripon Ionut Apr 18 '13 at 17:05
    
Sure. The loop in the begin starts at the arg past zero "awkex" in this case and goes until the end of the args (ARGC) ( supplied by the $* from the shell ). If a number is evenly divisible by 2, it puts it into the even_ags associative array ( really a map ) where the value is the same as the key. It should work if you change the right side value to "monkey" or "1" etc ( but not "" ). The odd_args get everything else. What we really want is a hashset, but I don't think awk has those, so I just mirrored the key with the value. – n0741337 Apr 18 '13 at 17:15
    
the above should produce reasonable output but the trailing semi-colons have no function, the way to check for an index being in an array is via the "in" operator, printf is a builtin not a function, there's no need to loop through the fields to print them as-is ... – Ed Morton Apr 18 '13 at 17:29
    
@Ed Morton heh - semi colons are a force of habit from the other languages I program in and long awk 'one liners'. I didn't even notice them. It's true that if( FILENAME in odd_args ) print $0 would be cleaner than the first test/if loop I originally used. My solution also leaves a trailing " " on the last element printed which is probably undesired. Your solution's loop fixes the trailing space problem and is obviously more compact. – n0741337 Apr 18 '13 at 18:09

With GNU awk for ARGIND:

gawk '!(ARGIND%2){for (i=NF;i>1;i--) printf "%s ",$i; print $1; next} 1' file1 file2 ...

with other awks, just create your own "ARGIND" by incrementing a variable in an FNR==1 block, assuming none of the files are empty.

share|improve this answer

This is a perfect time to use the FNR variable. If FNR==1 then you're at the first line of a file:

awk '
    FNR==1 {filenum++} 
    filenum%2==0 {
        # reverse the words of this line
        n = NF
        for (i=n; i>=1; i--) $(NF+1) = $i
        for (i=1; i<=n; i++) $i = $(n+i)
        NF = n
    } 
    1
' one two three four five six

Testing:

# here's the contents of my files:
$ for f in one two three four five six ; do printf "%s: %s\n" $f "$(<$f)"; done
one: words in file one
two: words in file two
three: words in file three
four: words in file four
five: words in file five
six: words in file six

$ awk '                           
    FNR==1 {filenum++} 
    filenum%2==0 {
        n = NF
        for (i=n; i>=1; i--) $(NF+1) = $i
        for (i=1; i<=n; i++) $i = $(n+i)
        NF = n
    } 
    1
' one two three four five six

outputs

words in file one
two file in words
words in file three
four file in words
words in file five
six file in words
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