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I have an array that contains file paths. I would like to split the array to give me the file_name, dir_name and the extension. I am trying to use File::Basename perl module.

Can someone help me achieve this:

foreach (@files) {
    push((@file_basename,@dir_name,@ext), fileparse($_));
}

I know what I am doing is not right.. Can someone help me fix the above piece of code?

I know I can do this:

$filename = basename($file);

and then push this value into an array. Similarly do the same for dir and the extensions. Just looking for a better way.

Thanks in advance for your help.

share|improve this question
    
Running your code, I get : Not an ARRAY reference at ./push.pl line 13. I'm guessing it's complaining about (@file_basename, @dir_name, @ext) not being an actually array. Other people have given a more proper use of push and fileparse, chrsblck and amon –  kjprice Apr 18 '13 at 17:25
    
Thanks @kjprice I knew the code was not working. I was looking for an elegant solution in one line. Thanks for you help.. –  soothsayer Apr 18 '13 at 19:44

2 Answers 2

Looks like you're missing the 2nd parameter to fileparse. Which is @suffixes

Stated in the perldoc, for what you're looking for should look like this:

my($filename, $directories, $suffix) = fileparse($path, @suffixes);

If you don't have a list of suffixes, you can do something like this:

fileparse("/foo/bar/baz.txt", qr/\.[^.]*/);

Which should match any extension.

Then you can fix the push like so:

for my $file (@l){
    my ($name, $path, $suffix) = fileparse($file, qr/\.[^.]*/);

    push @name_list, $name;
    push @path_list, $path;
    push @suffix_list, $suffix;
}
share|improve this answer

This is an interesting problem. The simplest solution is just to write it all out:

for (@files) {
  my ($name, $path, $suffix) = fileparse($_);
  push @file_basename, $name;
  push @dir_name,      $path;
  push @ext,           $suffix;
}

We could throw away all clarity and loop over array references, pushing the corresponding scalar onto the end:

my @collectors = \(@file_basename, @dir_name, @ext);
for (@files) {
  my @parse = fileparse($_);
  push @{ $collectors[$_] }, $parse[$_] for 0 .. $#collectors;
}

Or we could define a push3 function:

sub push3 (\@\@\@@) { # use (+++@) prototype on p5v14 or later
  my @arrays = splice @_, 0, 3;
  ARG: while (1) {
     for (@arrays) {
       push @$_, shift;
       @_ or last ARG;
     }
  }
}

Or a more general multipush:

sub multipush($@) { # maybe use (+@) on p5v14 or later
   my $arrays = shift;
   ARG: while (1) {
     for (@$arrays) {
       push @$_, shift;
       @_ or last ARG;
     }
   }
}

Then:

for (@files) {
  push3 @file_basename, @dirname, @ext, fileparse($_);
}

Or

for (@files) {
   multipush [\( @file_basename, @dirname, @ext )], fileparse($_);
}

But I consider this solution to be inelegant, inflexible, and would advocate using the first and explicit solution.


To actually get a suffix instead of the empty string from fileparse, you have to specify regexes that match suffixes (extensions), like qr/\.[^.]+\z/.

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