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For currentUnknownBox, if I use "var" the expected functionality does not work as expected (currentUnknownBox becomes the first element clicked). If I remove the var, it works as expected. I am assuming this has something to do with global scope. Could someone explain this to me?

jQuery(".box.unknown").live('click',function()
{
    var currentUnknownBox = this;

    //if we are NOT on mobile, use jQuery UI dialog
    if (!Drupal.settings.is_mobile)
    {
        jQuery("#letter-input-dialog").dialog();

        jQuery('#letter_input_form').submit(function()
        {
            var letter = jQuery("#letter_input").val();
            jQuery("#letter-input-dialog").dialog('close');
            jQuery("#letter_input").val('');
            that.validateAndSaveLetter(currentUnknownBox, letter);
            //Do not let the form actually submit
            return false;
        });
    }
    else
    {
        var letter = prompt('Please enter a letter to use in your guess');
        that.validateAndSaveLetter(that.currentUnknownBox, letter);
    }
});

EDIT: The problem is I am re-declaring my submit function every time.

share|improve this question
    
Where is defined that ? –  dystroy Apr 18 '13 at 16:46
    
currentUnknownBox seems to be fine, but what is that? And why is there also a currentUnknownBox property on the that variable (expected in the else clause)? –  Bergi Apr 18 '13 at 16:48
    
unrelated to your problem, but in JS curly-brace placement matters and should probably not be on their own lines: stackoverflow.com/questions/3641519/… –  Zach L Apr 18 '13 at 17:00
    
@ZachL: That's only for object literals. Where you put block braces is personal coding style, and (although I don't like) Allman style is fine –  Bergi Apr 18 '13 at 17:25
    
@Bergi true, but it's important to be consistent, so even a minor edge case (which this is not) is enough reason to not use Allman style IMO. –  Zach L Apr 18 '13 at 17:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that every time one of these is clicked, you're adding a new submit event handler to your form. But the first one will always fire first. When you don't declare the var, you're overwriting the variable that that first handler is looking at. But the mistake is adding a new handler every time. I would do it like so:

var currentUnknownBox;
jQuery('#letter_input_form').submit(function()
    {
        var letter = jQuery("#letter_input").val();
        jQuery("#letter-input-dialog").dialog('close');
        jQuery("#letter_input").val('');
        that.validateAndSaveLetter(currentUnknownBox, letter);
        //Do not let the form actually submit
        return false;
    });
jQuery("#letter-input-dialog").dialog({autoOpen: false});

jQuery(".box.unknown").live('click',function(){
    currentUnknownBox = this;

    //if we are NOT on mobile, use jQuery UI dialog
    if (!Drupal.settings.is_mobile)
     {
       jQuery("#letter-input-dialog").dialog('open');
      } else {
        var letter = prompt('Please enter a letter to use in your guess');
       that.validateAndSaveLetter(currentUnknownBox, letter);
      }   
});

Incidentally, .live is deprecated. You should use .on instead.

share|improve this answer

Whenever you use var you are declaring the scope of a variable. If you omit it then JavaScript assumes the most compatible option which is global. The technical term is "hoisting". And to be more accurate, JavaScript has what is called functional scoping so even if you declare a variable inside a for loop, JavaScript is "hoisting" it to the top of the closest function.

share|improve this answer

You forgot to declare the var 'that'. I think you need to do this before 'if' statement

var that = this;
share|improve this answer
    
See edit, I think I figured it out –  Chris Muench Apr 18 '13 at 16:50
    
Where? I cant see where you are redeclaring. –  Marcelo Rodovalho Apr 18 '13 at 17:00
1  
See Dan's answer. This code: jQuery('#letter_input_form').submit(function() {... gets run every time .box.unknown is clicked, adding a new event handler to #letter_input_form. –  Zach L Apr 18 '13 at 18:05
    
On yeah, really. Anyway, the .live deprecated. –  Marcelo Rodovalho Apr 18 '13 at 18:20

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