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I'm trying to declare the array Scores as an array of textboxes. It doesn't have a size. I also need to declare it as an instance variable, and instantiate it in the method, CreateTextBoxes. I keep getting an error, "Scores is a field but is used like a type."

namespace AverageCalculator
{
    public partial class AverageCalculator : Form
    {

    private TextBox[] Scores;

    public AverageCalculator()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void AverageCalculator_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        btnCalculate.Visible = false;
    }

    private void btnOK_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int intNumTextBoxes;

        intNumTextBoxes = Convert.ToInt32(txtNumScores.Text);

        this.Height = 500;
        btnCalculate.Visible = true;
        btnOK.Enabled = false;

    }

    private void CreateTextBoxes(int number)
    {
        Scores[number] = new Scores[number];

        int intTop = 150;

        for (int i = 0; i < 150; i++)
        {

        }
    }
}
}
share|improve this question
    
Is there a class or a struct somewhere that define "Scores" or is it a variable inside your class AverageCalculator? – LightStriker Apr 18 '13 at 16:48
    
Just a variable inside my class AverageCalculator. This is my only class in this application at the moment. – user1911789 Apr 18 '13 at 16:48
    
Than the answers so far are correct. When you use the keyword new, it is to create a new instance of a type such as a class or a struct. If you write new Scores, the compiler assume you are trying to create a new instance of the class Scores and cannot find any definition for such class. The type of that variable is TextBox[], not Scores. Scores is the name of the variable. – LightStriker Apr 18 '13 at 16:50

your CreateTextBoxes should probably be something like this:

private void CreateTextBoxes(int number)
{
    Scores = new TextBox[number];

    for (int i = 0; i < number; i++)
    {
        Scores[i] = new TextBox();
    }
}

As Adil suggested, a List<TextBox> is probably better in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah. The next bit of the assignment is writing the loop. I know how to do that, I was just having trouble instantiating the array correctly. Thank you. (: – user1911789 Apr 18 '13 at 16:51

You need to instantiate TextBox but number should be constant You can read more about the array creation expression here. Its better to use List instead of array if you want variable size.

Scores = new TextBox[number];

Using List

List<TextBox> Scores= new List<TextBox>();
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know any class named TextBoxes... :p – LightStriker Apr 18 '13 at 16:51
    
That was a typo, thanks @LightStriker – Adil Apr 18 '13 at 16:52

Your code should read:

Scores = new TextBox[number];
// do things with this array
share|improve this answer

The problem is in

private void CreateTextBoxes(int number)
    {
        Scores[number] = new Scores[number];

        int intTop = 150;

        for (int i = 0; i < 150; i++)
        {

        }
    }

When you are trying to initialize the array, you are using the name of the field as they type and are including an index to the field name. Just change the new type to TextBox and remove the index accessor like this:

private void CreateTextBoxes(int number)
    {
        Scores = new TextBox[number];

        int intTop = 150;

        for (int i = 0; i < 150; i++)
        {

        }
    }
share|improve this answer

replace line 1 with line 2

 Scores[number] = new Scores[number];
 Scores[number] = new TextBox();
share|improve this answer
    
This worked. Thank you. (: – user1911789 Apr 18 '13 at 16:54

You can't do this.

Scores[number] = new Scores[number];

Use a list of TextBox.

share|improve this answer

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