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I'm attempting to implement A* pathfinding around a cube, the cube is made up of 6 grids and to keep it simple I have 4 methods GetXPlus, GetXMinus, GetYPlus, GetYMinus. Each method checks to see if the next tile is within the current grid space, if its not it switches to the appropriate grid.

The problem I'm having is when attempting to get a tile from a grid that is flipped the other way from the current grid, the tile returned is on the opposite side. Is there a way or approach which would allow me to avoid writing unique logic for every single origin grid and direction?

To help articulate my problem, In this I have originated from the (purple) grid and are using the GetXPlus method :

enter image description here

A snippit of my current implementation (each grid is 64 by 64):

public Tile GetXPlus( int currentX, int currentY )
{
    var newX = currentX + 1;
    var tile = GetTile( newX , currentY );

    if( newX > 64 ) //Get adjacent XPlus Grid 
    { 
        currentGrid = SetCurrentGrid( XPlusGridIndex );
        tile = GetTile( newX - 64, currentY );
    }

    return tile;
}

Background

This implementation originated from an excellent answer to a different question suggested here: http://gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/53866/pathfinding-on-a-uneven-planetary-surface

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Just realised there is a slight error in my picture, on the view of the cube the blue side's X and Y direction should be same as the net view –  Caius Eugene Apr 18 '13 at 17:19
1  
An interesting problem I hadn't considered in my answer. –  Byte56 Apr 18 '13 at 17:22
10  
You can solve your problem and make your algorithm more general by making your A* algorithm consider a sequence of adjacent nodes rather than hard-coding in "increase x, decrease x, increase y, decrease y" as the adjacent nodes. If you solve the more general problem then you are free to create more interesting topologies without changing the algorithm. –  Eric Lippert Apr 18 '13 at 18:30
2  
why don't you use a graph? –  Heisenbug Apr 18 '13 at 19:13
6  
A graph is logically just two lists: a list of nodes and a list of edges; an edge is just a pair of nodes, sometimes also with a "cost". Usually graphs are implemented so that it is very cheap to get a list of edges that contain a given node. So to use the A* algorithm you just look at the current node and ask "what are my neighbour nodes and how much does it cost to get there?" –  Eric Lippert Apr 19 '13 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

I would suggest that you go even further than suggested by the previous answer. Create a cube that represents all tiles, and that you cache the neighbours of every tile. As the relations between tiles are fixed, it will safe you a lot of time.

Afterwords you can use a double[,,] or int[,,,] to keep track of your processed tiles, and based on that add neighbours to your Queue<Tile>.

If needed you can implement GetDirection(Tile tile) too. That function only have to search at the directions dictionary.

public class Cube { private Tile[,,] tiles;

    public Cube(int size)
    {
        tiles = new Tile[size, size, 6];

        // initialize.
        for (var side = 0; side < 6; side++)
        {
            for (var x = 0; x < size; x++)
            {
                for (var y = 0; y < size; y++)
                {
                    tiles[x, y, side] = new Tile(x, y, side);
                }
            }
        }

        // set directions & neighbors
        for (var side = 0; side < 6; side++)
        {
            for (var x = 0; x < size; x++)
            {
                for (var y = 0; y < size; y++)
                {
                    // todo: implement.
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public Tile this[int x, int y, int side]
    {
        get
        {
            return tiles[x, y, side];
        }
    }
}

public class Tile
{
    private Dictionary<DirectionType, Tile> directions = new Dictionary<DirectionType, Tile>();

    private Tile[] neighbors = new Tile[4];

    public Tile(int x, int y, int side)
    {
        this.X = x;
        this.Y = y;
        this.Side = side;
    }

    public int X { get; private set; }
    public int Y { get; private set; }
    public int Side { get; private set; }

    public Tile this[DirectionType dir]
    {
        get
        {
            return directions[dir];
        }
    }



    public Tile[] Neighbors { get { return neighbors; } }
}

public enum DirectionType
{
    // delta: +1, 0
    e,
    // delta: 0, +1
    n,
    // delta: -1, 0
    w,
    // delta: 0, -1
    s,
    // delta: 0, 0
    X
}
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+1 Be careful with arrays (as opposed to List<>s or other collection types). They're immutable, and get duplicated every time you pass them around. With your example, that doesn't seem to be an issue, but those that aren't familiar with how the GC works in this instance can quickly run into crippling performance problems. –  David Lively May 15 '13 at 15:20
    
@DavidLively that's a good point, you always have to keep that in mind. But in this case an array is exactly what you want. The neighbours of a tile are immutable, and only accessible indirectly. The same can be said about the cube. The advantage of memory usage and speed are preferable in this case. –  Corniel Nobel May 16 '13 at 11:44

You could use functions mapping from one 3d coordinate space composed of "X coordinate", "Y Coordinate" and "Tile" to another.

Given an order:

enum TileBorder
{
    Left   = 0,
    Top    = 1,
    Right  = 2,
    Bottom = 3
}

you can store these transitions in arrays of your Tile class:

class Tile
{
    public Tile[] Neighbors { get; set; }
    public Func<int, int, int>[] XTransitions { get; set; }
    public Func<int, int, int>[] YTransitions { get; set; }

    public void GetXPlus(int x, int y, out int newX, out int newY, out Tile newTile)
    {
        x++;
        if (x <= 64)
        {
            newX = x;
            newY = y;
            newTile = this;
        }
        else
        {
            newX = XTransitions[(int)TileBorder.Right](x, y);
            newY = YTransitions[(int)TileBorder.Right](x, y);
            newTile = Neighbors[(int)TileBorder.Right];
        }
    }
    // ...
}

Then you only need to pay a little attention when you set the structure up. For example, this is how you could set up the green tile, assuming your coordinates run from 1 to 64 inclusive.

Tile pink   = new Tile();
Tile green  = new Tile();
Tile orange = new Tile();
Tile purple = new Tile();
Tile blue   = new Tile();

green.Neighbors = new Tile[] 
{ 
    /* left */   orange, 
    /* top */    pink,
    /* right */  blue,
    /* bottom */ purple 
};

green.XTransitions = new Func<int, int, int>[] 
{
    /* left */   (x, y) => 1, 
    /* top */    (x, y) => x,
    /* right */  (x, y) => 64,
    /* bottom */ (x, y) => x 
};

green.YTransitions = new Func<int, int, int>[] 
{
    /* left */   (x, y) => 65 - y, 
    /* top */    (x, y) => 64,
    /* right */  (x, y) => 65 - y,
    /* bottom */ (x, y) => 1
};

Note that the tile transition function is just a lookup, but to be fully flexible you could also use functions of the types:
Func<int, int, Tile, int> for the x coordinate,
Func<int, int, Tile, int> for the y coordinate, and
Func<int, int, Tile, Tile> for the tile.

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