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I have the following code

  SELECT 
    CASE WHEN @ID = 1 THEN CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],101)
         ELSE CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],103) 
    END AS [insert_date]
FROM Dates 
ORDER BY [insert_date] DESC

Now, when the date is in 101 format, it outputs in MM/DD/YYYY and order is correct (DESC by month) but when the date is in 103 format, it outputs in DD/MM/YYYY and order is INCorrect (DESC by day).

How can I order it by month even when date is in DD/MM/YYYY?

Thank you

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1  
Why is your output in a specific format at all? Do that at the presentation layer, stop making T-SQL your front-end prettifier. That's what the front end is for. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 18 '13 at 17:47
    
Thank you guys, almost all solutions work. (the code I posted was a very simplified version of my code. these listed solutions work. @AaronBertrand, I don't have much exp with front end (.net/c#) to deal with it at that stage. :) might be easy thing if I just look around...which I will now. :) –  user1569220 Apr 18 '13 at 21:00
1  
Yes in C# look at .Format() - much better to do this there than in SQL, especially if you're sorting by date. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 18 '13 at 21:09
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
SELECT 
CASE WHEN @ID = 1 THEN CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],101)
     ELSE CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],103) 
END AS [insert_date]
FROM Dates 
ORDER BY CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],101) DESC
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since this is 2008, I would use the date type instead. Otherwise, this is the solution. –  RandomUs1r Apr 18 '13 at 17:37
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Try this :-

order by datepart(month,[insert_date]) desc
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try using format 112

SELECT CASE WHEN @ID = 1 THEN CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],101) ELSE CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],103) END AS [insert_date] FROM Dates ORDER BY CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],112) DESC

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If you actually want the ordering to use the month, regardless of year (i.e. keep all january entries together for multiple years), then use the solution by @Indoknight.

If you actually just want the results in descending order of date, regardless of date formatting, then include the table name as part of the order by:

SELECT 
CASE WHEN @ID = 1 THEN CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],101)
     ELSE CONVERT(nvarchar(10), [insert_date],103) 
END AS [insert_date]
FROM DateTest 
ORDER BY DateTest.[insert_date] DESC
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Did you mean to use [insert_date] as both your input column name, and as the output computed column name? It isn't clear, but (as confirmed by Jermy in comments) this does mean that you are overriding the value used by the ORDER BY clause. Is that what you want?

You really should never order dates by their string representation unless you can guarantee that they are in a lexically sortable format (such as yyyy-MM-dd). And unless you have some really great reason for doing so, you should just sort by the date itself. Don't convert it to a nvarchar at all.

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this works perfectly fine in t-sql on an order by clause. –  RandomUs1r Apr 18 '13 at 17:36
1  
@Matt Johnson - using [insert_date] for both the source and aliased column name does not produce an error in SQL Server 2008 R2. This is a perfectly legal construct. I agree with you though that the OP is probably not trying to obtain the result as stated - I would guess they are simply trying to get the dates to always be in descending order. –  JeremyDWill Apr 18 '13 at 17:37
    
@JeremyDWill - Really? I'll have to check that out. So what then is the effect? Does it replace the original column? Produce a second column with the same name? Does the ORDER BY clause use the original table value, or the computed column name? –  Matt Johnson Apr 18 '13 at 17:44
    
@Matt Johnson - See my newly posted answer. I just verified this on my dev machine. The short answer is that the order by is performed as the last step against the results of the select statement. So it is using the aliased column name. For more info see sql.co.il/books/insidetsql2008/… –  JeremyDWill Apr 18 '13 at 17:53
    
@JeremyDWill - Thanks. I just checked also, and you are right! I will update my answer. Still, I think ordering dates by their string representation is a bad idea. –  Matt Johnson Apr 18 '13 at 17:56
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