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This is out of deitel's c++ book and I'm trying to understand a bit more about why the continuation condition works and how it knows to quit. s1 and s2 are arrays so when s2 tries to assign the '\n' to s1 does it return null?

void mystery1( char *s1, const char *s2 )
{
while ( *s1 != '\0' )
s1++;

for ( ; *s1 = *s2; s1++, s2++ )
; // empty statement
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
*s1 = *s2

Is an expression. Expressions in C/C++ evaluates to values, and in this case it returns the value assigned to *s1. When the '\0' is assigned to *s1, the expression evaluates to 0 which is false clearly.

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+1 beat me to it. –  Tom Oct 22 '09 at 18:08
    
Would not it depend on the return type of the operator= ? (yes here we are dealing with builtins, but with a custom class...) –  Matthieu M. Oct 22 '09 at 19:13
    
@Matthieu M. Expressions in C/C++ always evaluate to something. This applies to values of a user-defined type or a built-in type: struct myclass { }; int main() { myclass(); }. I am not 100% sure about "always" in the first sentence, but that what I understand about statments in C/C++. –  AraK Oct 22 '09 at 19:19
    
It's quite possible that T::operator=(T const& rhs) returns void. But with a custom class, there are far more ways in which this idiom can fail, e.g. when there's no conversion to bool. –  MSalters Oct 23 '09 at 8:33

Yes. It must be a boolean expression, can be anything inside of it.

The way this works is as follows:

void mystery1( char *s1, const char *s2 )
{
   while ( *s1 != '\0' )  // NEW: Stop when encountering zero character, aka string end.
      s1++;

   // NEW: Now, s1 points to where first string ends

   for ( ; *s1 = *s2; s1++, s2++ )  
      // Assign currently pointed to character from s2 into s1, 
      // then move both pointers by 1
      // Stop when the value of the expression *s1=*s2 is false.
      // The value of an assignment operator is the value that was assigned,
      // so it will be the value of the character that was assigned (copied from s2 to s1).
      // Since it will become false when assigned is false, aka zero, aka end of string,
      // this means the loop will exit after copying end of string character from s2 to s1, ending the appended string

      ; // empty statement
   }
}

What this does is copy all characters from s2 onto the end of s1, basically appending s2 to s1.

Just to be clear, \n has nothing to do with this code.

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Zero is not known as end of line. It is end of string. –  Rob Kennedy Oct 22 '09 at 18:12
    
Typo, fixed. Thx –  DVK Oct 22 '09 at 18:12
    
it does not mean 0 characters it signifies the null terminator. –  JonH Oct 22 '09 at 18:13
    
thanks so much for the walkthough DVK. I'd figured out what it did but was confused by how the for loop knew to terminate. :) –  shiitake Oct 22 '09 at 20:54

That code has nothing to do with '\n'. The result of an assignment expression is the new value of the assigned-to variable, so when you assign '\0' to *s1, the result of that expression is '\0', which is treated as false. The loop runs through the point where the entire string is copied.

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is the code like this, check the extra brackets I added ...:

void mystery1( char *s1, const char *s2 )
{
  while ( *s1 != '\0' )
  {
    s1++; 
  }

  for ( ; *s1 = *s2; s1++, s2++ )
  {
    ; // empty statement
  }
}

so, first while checks the end of the string s1; and the for copy s2 at the end of s1.

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Scope operators are not required when a scope only contains one expression. –  Marcin Oct 22 '09 at 18:40

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