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I have a text file with just 1 line, but 2G characters.

I need to find something within the file, but the line is too long to open in any editor - either on Unix, or if I ftp it over to my PC...

Is there a quick / simple way to insert a newline, for example, every 120 characters?

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closed as off topic by Juhana, John Kugelman, iiSeymour, martin clayton, hammar Apr 18 '13 at 20:31

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using which program language? is this related to programming? –  Luis Siquot Apr 18 '13 at 18:36
    
have you tried using less en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Less_%28Unix%29. from my experience, it does a good job handling large files. –  Colin D Apr 18 '13 at 18:37
    
@Colin - less will display it on the screen for me, and wrap the line a billion times. But then, if I pipe less's output into a file, the resulting file will still be just one line. –  Marjeta Apr 18 '13 at 18:42
    
It's a close call, but I'd argue text processing probably is on-topic (though unix.stackexchange.com would be a better bet). I mean, how many non-programmers need to do this sort of thing... –  therefromhere Apr 19 '13 at 0:03
    
BTW, here's a duplicate on unix.SE : unix.stackexchange.com/questions/60219/… –  therefromhere Apr 19 '13 at 0:04
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Fold command does that, so if you want to wrap after 120..

fold -w120 fie > newfile
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This one works. Thanks!!! –  Marjeta Apr 18 '13 at 18:56
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sed 's/\(.\{120\}\)/\1\n/g' file.txt

if you need to create a new file, then just redirect the output:

sed 's/\(.\{120\}\)/\1\n/g' file.txt > new_file.txt

Following an example of for 4 characters per line

[fotanus@thing ~]$ cat test.txt 
qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqq
[fotanus@thing ~]$ sed 's/\(.\{4\}\)/\1\n/g' test.txt > a.txt
[fotanus@thing ~]$ cat a.txt 
qqqq
qqqq
qqqq
qqqq
qqqq
qqqq
qqqq
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It's running... holding my fingers crossed. –  Marjeta Apr 18 '13 at 18:44
1  
please accept @vidit answer, I'm sure it is the best way to do. –  fotanus Apr 18 '13 at 18:46
    
@fotanus- Thanks :) –  vidit Apr 18 '13 at 18:50
    
It doesn't work. new_file.txt is also just one gigantic line –  Marjeta Apr 18 '13 at 18:53
    
@Marjeta interesting,perhaps the redirect doesn’t work? work in the terminal output. Anyway, fold is the right tool for this job, not sed –  fotanus Apr 18 '13 at 18:59
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you can try this line:

 sed -r 's/.{120}/&\n/g' file

if you want to write the change back to your original file:

sed -ir 's/.{120}/&\n/g' file

for example:

file has 100 s, every 12 chars add a linebreak:

kent$  cat file                   
ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss


kent$  sed -r 's/.{12}/&\n/g' file
ssssssssssss
ssssssssssss
ssssssssssss
ssssssssssss
ssssssssssss
ssssssssssss
ssssssssssss
ssssssssssss
ssss
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Actually, I don't want to overwrite the original file. –  Marjeta Apr 18 '13 at 18:47
    
Ugh! sed: illegal option -- r Usage: sed [-n] Script [File ...] sed [-n] [-e Script] ... [-f Script_file] ... [File ...] –  Marjeta Apr 18 '13 at 18:51
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if you do not mind creating another file. Tested this with bash on linux. Here blah.out is the input file

while read -r -d '' -n 120 record; do echo $record; done<blah.out > blah2.out
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