Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got this, and it works:

myObject.myFunction = (function() {
    var closure = 0;

    return function(value) {
        if (arguments.length) {
            closure = value;
        } else {
            return closure;
        }
    }
})();

It acts as both a getter and a setter, so that calling myFunction(3.14) will set the closure and calling myFunction() will get the closure's value.

Q: Can I separate it out into a more wordy example (without being ridiculous)? What I'd like to do is something like this:

myObject.myFunction1 = myFunction2;
myObject.myFunction1();

function myFunction2() {
    var closure = 0;

    return function(value) {
        if (arguments.length) {
            closure = value;
        } else {
            return closure;
        }
    }
}

I'm just trying to break down JavaScript into as small a chunks as possible so that my students can concentrate.

Edit 1:

Oh wait: I don't need myFunction2 at all.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Juhana, bfavaretto, Jean, OverZealous, Aren Apr 18 '13 at 23:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
I can't quite grasp what the actual question here is. –  Juhana Apr 18 '13 at 18:45
1  
Yeah, I have problem with that. –  Phillip Apr 18 '13 at 18:46
    
In my proposed solution, when I call myObject.myFunction1(), it returns a function. So really I should say myFunction3 = myObject.myFunction1() –  Phillip Apr 18 '13 at 18:52
1  
Do you mean myObject.myFunction1 = myFunction2();? That should work. –  bfavaretto Apr 18 '13 at 18:54
    
@Phillip I now regret having voted to close your question. Voted to reopen, and also added a second part to my answer, that hopefully will help you more than the first part. –  bfavaretto Apr 19 '13 at 4:13

5 Answers 5

Are you just looking for the simplest way to explain closures like:

function closure() {
    var privateData = "I'm hidden!";

    return {
        get: function () {
            return privateData;
        },
        set: function (arg) {
            privateData = arg;
        }
    };
}

var privateDataAccess = closure();

console.log(typeof (privateData)); // logs undefined -- privateData is out of scope
console.log(privateDataAccess.get()); // logs "I'm hidden!"
privateDataAccess.set("Now you changed me!");
console.log(privateDataAccess.get()); // logs "Now you changed me!"

That is probably as simple as it gets I think :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I just don't like the syntax of a get and set. I think I've decided on using the jQuery type of syntax where not passing in a parameter implies that it's a getter and passing in a parameter implies that it's a setter. –  Phillip Apr 18 '13 at 19:51
    
Yeah, I get you. The jQuery method makes the user side of the API more easy to understand and easier to use. Maybe you can use this in conjunction with your example as a simple of example of what goes on on the other side of an API (behind the curtains). –  orb Apr 18 '13 at 20:26

In your first example you are assigning the inner function to the property "myFunction".

In you second example you are assigning the outer function to the property "myfunction2".

This results in different behavior since the first example uses an immediately invoked function expression, where as the second example assigns a declared function named "myFunction2" to "myFunction1". In order to invoke the inner function you would actually have to do something like this.

myObject.myFunction1 = myFunction2;
var myFunction3 = myObject.myFunction1();
myFunction3();

or

myObject.myFunction1 = myFunction2();
myObject.myFunction1();
share|improve this answer

If I understand you, myObject.myFunction1 = myFunction2(); should work.

However, I really don't see any advantages from using that pattern for a simple getter and setter. You "closure" variable is only accessible from inside the getter/setter, and the function does nothing more than simply setting its value (without transforming it). I mean, the same could be accomplished with a regular property directly on your object, rather than a function.


Now I'm paying more attention to the fact that you're looking for a better way to explain closures. You could use meaningful, accurate names for your variables and functions, and add comments. Here is one suggestion, based on your code:

function createClosure() {
    // Only the function returned below can see the secret
    var secret = 0;
    return function(value) {
        // If anything was passed, change secret (returns undefined)
        if (arguments.length) {
            secret = value;
        // Nothing was passed, return secret
        } else {
            return secret;
        }

    }
}

// Create a function that enables access to the secret
var closure = createClosure();

// Use it to read the secret
console.log('the closure holds the secret: ' + closure());

// Use it to change the secret
closure(10);

// Read it again to check
console.log('the secret now holds ' + closure());
share|improve this answer

I think this is what I'm looking for:

function ConjunctionJunction() {
    var myClosure = 0;

    return function(myValue) {
        if (arguments.length) {
            myClosure = myValue;
        } else {
            return myClosure;
        }
    }
};
myObject = new Object();
myObject.myFunction = ConjunctionJunction(); // This creates a function and assigns it to the variable myObject.myFunction
myObject.myFunction(3.14); // This calls the newly created function as a setter
var x = myObject.myFunction(); // This calls it as a getter, which returns a value.
log(x);
share|improve this answer

No, wait. I think this is what I'm looking for. This might really be it:

myObject = new Object();

;(function($, window, undefined) {
    var Variables = {};

    myObject.myFunction = function(argValue) {
        if (arguments.length) {
            Variables.myValue = argValue;
        } else {
            return Variables.myValue;
        }
    }
})(jQuery, window);


myObject.myFunction(3.14);
var x = myObject.myFunction();
log(x);
share|improve this answer
    
I thought you were trying to simplify your example syntactically to focus on closures? –  bfavaretto Apr 19 '13 at 4:21

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.